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What Should Be On New FBI Director's To-Do List?

For the first time in years, there's new leadership at the FBI. Attorney General Eric Holder conducted the swearing-in ceremony on Wednesday. While Jim Comey starts his job Thursday, he's been working to get ready for years — preparing for threats ranging from terrorist bombings to cyber attacks.
NPR

Data Marketing Critics Check Out What's Written About Them

Companies that collect and sell information about you are usually pretty secretive. But one of the biggest is now allowing consumers to look themselves up. Acxiom Corporation has set up the website: AboutTheData.com.
NPR

Calif. Gov. Debates Changing Who's Eligible For Jury Duty

The California legislature passed a bill that would allow lawful permanent residents to sit on juries. Governor Jerry Brown has until Oct. 13 to sign the bill into law. If he does, California will be the first state to allow non-citizens to perform jury duty.
NPR

Is Operation Streamline Worth Its Budget Being Tripled?

The Senate immigration bill calls for tripling a controversial federal court program called Operation Streamline. The program takes people caught crossing the border illegally, gives them prison sentences, then deports them. It's hugely expensive — but does it work?
NPR

Sen. Tom Udall On Syrian Resolution

On Wednesday, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee passed a resolution authorizing President Obama to take military action against the Syrian regime. It goes to the full Senate over the objections of New Mexico Democrat Tom Udall. Steve Inskeep talks with Sen. Udall about his concerns over intervention in Syria.
NPR

Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes

Republican Rep. Austin Scott held a town hall meeting in Thomasville, Georgia, Wednesday. Among the topics that constituents were there to talk about: Syria. Scott told constituents he doesn't plan to support the resolution authorizing U.S. military strikes in Syria.
NPR

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

With more than 300,000 residents, St. Louis, Mo., has a lot on its mind. Local poet Henry Goldkamp hopes to find out just what makes the city tick with his new public art project. He's installed 37 typewriters city-wide, asking for answers to the question, "What The Hell Is St. Louis Thinking?"
NPR

More Cities Sweeping Homeless Into Less Prominent Areas

Nationally, there is an increase in cities responding to visible poverty including homelessness by criminalizing it. In recent years, municipalities from Seattle to Tampa have cracked down on the homeless and groups that help them. Now, Raleigh, N.C., is trying to find middle ground between the homeless and business owners.
NPR

Under Dust And Rust, 'New' Classic Cars Go Up For Auction

A long-closed car dealership in Nebraska will soon auction more than 500 classic cars, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer. Though time has taken a toll on many on the block, in some ways the cars are brand new. Some still have plastic on the seats and the price sticker on the window.
NPR

Fixing Stove Hoods To Keep Pollution Out Of The Kitchen

Range hoods are designed to capture the pollutants from your stove, but many models are not effective and it's hard for consumers to know how good a hood is. But researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab are developing a new standardized test that manufacturers can use to rate their range hoods.

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