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Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

The housing minister has approved the construction of 1,200 new apartments, a move that threatens newly restarted peace talks.
NPR

Police Rescue Teen, Kill Suspect In Idaho Wilderness

An FBI ground unit moved on a remote campsite in Idaho's Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, where they shot and killed James DiMaggio.
NPR

Faux Meth Is Big Business In 'Breaking Bad' Town

Entrepreneurs in Albuquerque, N.M., the setting of the TV series Breaking Bad, have created blue "meth" rock candy, "Bathing Bad" bath products, and a tour of sites used in filming the series. That has some critics worried all the moneymaking glorifies drugs.
NPR

Lottery Legend Has Seen A Lot Of Winning Tickets

Rebecca Paul Hargrove, who created two state lotteries and now runs a third, understands what makes a lottery program work.
NPR

Lottery Winner Stays Grounded After $220 Million Jackpot

In this weekend's Sunday Conversation, NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Brad Duke, who won $220 million in the lottery in 2005. Duke talks about the moment he realized he'd won, and how his life changed after winning. Tell us: If you won the lottery, how do you think it would change you?
NPR

'We Had No Business' In White Neighborhoods

Retired Maryland State Police Officer Neil Franklin says Baltimore police were led to believe that young black men were the sole users of heroin and crack cocaine. He speaks with host Rachel Martin about the impact of the war on drugs in the communities he's worked in.
NPR

An Engineer Beats The Physics Of Traffic

William Beaty, an electrical engineer, has come up with a "traffic fluid dynamics" theory to explain traffic jams, and tells host Rachel Martin how drivers can help smooth out the waves of traffic flow.
NPR

Drug War Waged Hard Against People Of Color

Attorney General Eric Holder says the war on drugs failed to stop demand and decimated black communities. Host Rachel Martin talks to University of California Santa Cruz sociology professor Craig Reinerman about drug policy since the 1970s.
NPR

These Dioramas Are To Die For

Using figures that were made for miniature train sets, a former Las Vegas crime reporter is finding big success creating and selling tiny imaginary crime scenes. Abigail Goldman's macabre, and sometimes funny, "Die-O-Ramas" are selling out before she's even completed them.
NPR

'Books On Bikes' Helps Seattle Librarians Pedal To The Masses

Imagine a library small enough to be towed by a bicycle; on that bike is a librarian who can check your books out, answer research questions and even issue a library card. The Seattle Public Library is experimenting with a program that does just that.

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