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Lottery Legend Has Seen A Lot Of Winning Tickets

Rebecca Paul Hargrove, who created two state lotteries and now runs a third, understands what makes a lottery program work.
NPR

Lottery Winner Stays Grounded After $220 Million Jackpot

In this weekend's Sunday Conversation, NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Brad Duke, who won $220 million in the lottery in 2005. Duke talks about the moment he realized he'd won, and how his life changed after winning. Tell us: If you won the lottery, how do you think it would change you?
NPR

'We Had No Business' In White Neighborhoods

Retired Maryland State Police Officer Neil Franklin says Baltimore police were led to believe that young black men were the sole users of heroin and crack cocaine. He speaks with host Rachel Martin about the impact of the war on drugs in the communities he's worked in.
NPR

An Engineer Beats The Physics Of Traffic

William Beaty, an electrical engineer, has come up with a "traffic fluid dynamics" theory to explain traffic jams, and tells host Rachel Martin how drivers can help smooth out the waves of traffic flow.
NPR

Drug War Waged Hard Against People Of Color

Attorney General Eric Holder says the war on drugs failed to stop demand and decimated black communities. Host Rachel Martin talks to University of California Santa Cruz sociology professor Craig Reinerman about drug policy since the 1970s.
NPR

These Dioramas Are To Die For

Using figures that were made for miniature train sets, a former Las Vegas crime reporter is finding big success creating and selling tiny imaginary crime scenes. Abigail Goldman's macabre, and sometimes funny, "Die-O-Ramas" are selling out before she's even completed them.
NPR

'Books On Bikes' Helps Seattle Librarians Pedal To The Masses

Imagine a library small enough to be towed by a bicycle; on that bike is a librarian who can check your books out, answer research questions and even issue a library card. The Seattle Public Library is experimenting with a program that does just that.
NPR

The Tricky Business Of Predicting Where Media Will Go Next

One of journalism's most recognizable mastheads, The Washington Post, is entering a new era with a new owner. In 1992, the paper's managing editor urged it to get at the forefront of the upcoming digital revolution, but it so far has fallen short in a world of fast-paced BuzzFeeds.
NPR

Florida's Highwaymen Painted Idealized Landscapes In Jim Crow South

In the Jim Crow Florida of the 1960's a group of young African-American landscape painters became famous for their art. They also made a lot of money selling oil paintings that depicted an idealized, candy-colored Florida of palms and beaches, and sleepy inlets. These young painters came to be known as the Highwaymen, and they painted thousands of these paintings until the market was saturated and the whole genre vanished. Host Jacki Lyden traveled to Florida and explored their fascinating story. (This piece originally aired on All Things Considered on Sept. 19, 2012.)
NPR

Technology's Role In Romance Dates To The Telegraph

Modern technology has enabled people to find love without the old fashioned rituals like meeting in person or talking on the phone. And the anonymity of social networks has also opened up opportunities for fraudsters and fakes. The movie and TV show Catfish have told versions of this story. But when tech journalist Clive Thompson recently rediscovered a novel from 1879, he found that people have been finding love and anonymity through technology at least as far back as the telegraph.

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