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Praise Pours In For Dairy Queen Manager Who Helped A Blind Man

Joey Prusak saw a visually impaired man drop a $20 bill — and then watched as another customer picked it up and tried to say it was hers. The story of what he did next went viral. Prusak refused to serve the woman who had pocketed the money and gave the blind customer $20 from his own pocket.
NPR

In First Step, Syria Outlines Chemical Weapons Program

An international watchdog based in the Netherlands says it has received an "initial declaration" of chemical weapons from Damascus.
NPR

Part-Time Judge Picks Laughs Over The Law

Vince Sicari presided as a part-time judge in South Hackensack, N.J., until his moonlighting as standup comic and TV actor took center stage. Because some of his characters were racist and homophobic, the state ethics committee ruled that he had to choose. He appealed. New Jersey's Supreme Court also said choose, and Sicari resigned from the bench.
NPR

VIDEO: Tigers' Fielder Takes Fan's Chip After Chasing Foul

Was it fair or foul that first baseman Prince Fielder took a nacho chip from an unsuspecting fan during Thursday's game? Check out the amusing scene and Fielder's comments afterward.
NPR

13 People Shot In Chicago; 3-Year-Old Most Seriously Wounded

In what's thought to have been a gang-related incident, someone opened fire on a group of people in a park. The 3-year-old is in critical condition after a bullet struck his head.
NPR

Holder Makes Moral Argument Against Mandatory Sentences

Attorney General Eric Holder says the criminal justice system is broken. He spoke out on federal mandatory sentencing requirements in a speech to the Congressional Black Caucus on Thursday.
NPR

After Shooting Tragedies, States React With Legislation

Mass shootings provoke sorrow and outrage, but what actually changes? Not much in Congress regarding gun safety laws, but it's been a busy year for firearm and mental health legislation in states.
NPR

Sudan Leader's Visa Request Puts U.S. In Diplomatic Bind

The president of Sudan wants to travel to New York next week to attend the United Nations General Assembly. But the U.S. doesn't want to grant that visa because he is accused of genocide. Renee Montagne talks to Colum Lynch, a reporter for The Washington Post and Foreign Policy magazine, about why this diplomatic issue.
NPR

Repairing Flooded Infrastructure Is A Big Task In Colorado

Search and rescue efforts have slowed to a trickle in Colorado's flood-ravaged Front Range. The number of unaccounted for has fallen to around a hundred, while the number of presumed dead has grown to 10. After more than a week of flooding, the state faces massive challenges.
NPR

Why Companies And CEOs Rarely Admit To Wrongdoing

JPMorgan Chase revealed last year that some traders in London concealed losing $6 billion. The company has agreed to pay $900 million in fines, but federal regulators also forced the bank to admit to wrongdoing. One analyst says admitting mistakes tarnishes your reputation.

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