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New Army Tattoo Rules Won't Affect Already-Inked Soldiers

The U.S. Army is about to have tighter restrictions on tattoos for new recruits and for current soldiers. Visible tattoos, ones below the knees, below the elbows, or above the neckline will not be permitted for enlistees, but soldiers with these kinds of tattoos are grandfathered in. Soldier will have to pay to have tattoos that are deemed racist, sexist, or extremist removed. Melissa Block speaks with Josh Smith, the Afghanistan correspondent for Stars and Stripes for more details.
NPR

Four Men Charged In Chicago Shooting That Injured 13

Chicago police have charged four men — including two suspected gunmen — in the shooting injuries of 13 people. Police said the two suspects opened fire in retaliation for an earlier shooting, in which one of them was slightly wounded.
NPR

The Cruz Control Scenario In Texas

The chatter about a possible primary challenge to Sen. John Cornyn from GOP Sen. Ted Cruz's father might get louder as a result of the government shutdown debate.
NPR

The Mystery Of $600 Million Traded In The Blink Of An Eye

Somehow, information about the Fed's bond buying decision got into computers in Chicago faster than the speed of light. Those milliseconds meant millions.
NPR

Lose Weight Before Trying Other Sleep Apnea Treatments

Surgery sounds like a quick cure for sleep apnea, but a review of the evidence by doctors found the operations can be risky and disappointing for many people. Masks and pumps that keep airways open at night are effective. And the equipment is more comfortable than it used to be.
NPR

Why Are Most Rampage Shooters Men?

There have been more than 60 mass shootings in the U.S. since 1982; in only one instance was the shooter female. Researchers say that may be because men who want to harm people are more likely than women to use lethal weapons, like guns, and are more likely to blame others for their problems.
NPR

Should Parents Nix After-School Sports?

High school athletes devote a lot of hours to practice and games. Parents and coaches say playing sports builds character and teamwork. But do sports take too much time away from the classroom? In a recent article for The Atlantic, writer Amanda Ripley makes the case against after-school sports. She joins host Michel Martin, along with parents Dani Tucker and Glenn Ivey.
NPR

Can Mass Shootings Really Be Stopped?

It's been a week since a shooting at Washington, D.C.'s Navy Yard left 13 people dead, including the gunman. But is there a consensus forming on how to stop these attacks from happening again? Host Michel Martin speaks with former Congressman Asa Hutchinson; Ron Honberg of the National Alliance on Mental Illness; and the National Crime Prevention Council's Ann Harkins.
NPR

Questions Rise As Health Care Exchange Draws Near

The online marketplace for health insurance is scheduled to open in one week. But people are still confused about what that means and how the Affordable Care Act will affect them. Host Michel Martin runs through a health care Q&A with Mary Agnes Cary of Kaiser Health News.
NPR

Alleged Gunmen Charged In Chicago Mass Shooting

Four people have now been charged in connection with Thursday's shooting at Cornell Square Park on the city's South Side. Thirteen people were wounded in the incident, which police say is likely gang-related.

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