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Sluggish Economy Relies More On Part-Time Workers

As retailers work to stay afloat during the slow economic recovery, employers are cutting costs by streamlining staff schedules — increasingly relying on part-time workers, who can cover flexible shifts on short notice. But the unpredictable hours, modest wages and lack of benefits take a toll.
NPR

On Election Eve, Obama And Romney Try Blazing A Path To 270

On the final day of the 2012 campaign, President Obama and Mitt Romney are making a last push in states that could be critical to victory. Obama was scheduled to campaign in three swing states, while Romney had events planned in four. The only overlap was in Ohio, considered the linchpin of the election.
NPR

Eliminate Government? Not Mine, Thanks

A possible merger of local governments in Indiana faces trouble on Tuesday's ballot. Despite promises that a combined government would bring costs down, residents worry that their taxes could go up even as the quality of services declines.
NPR

Boy Killed In Dog Exhibit At Zoo: Onlookers' Screams 'Just Kept Coming'

In Pittsburgh, the 2-year-old's mother lifted him on to a railing. Tragically, he fell into the animals' exhibit and was set upon by the pack. Zookeepers were eventually able to lure most of the 11 dogs away. One had to be shot by police.
NPR

Gridlock: Will The Election Break The 'Lousy Status Quo'?

Whether it's Obama or Romney, the president will face a party in Congress hostile to his agenda, with no mandate from voters to push things through. With no consensus in the country, power may continue shifting back and forth between the parties.
NPR

Polls Put Race Within 'The Margin Of Litigation'

Election Day 2000 ended in a stalemate and weeks of finger-pointing and legal battles. Host Michel Martin looks at whether the country has learned the lessons from that crisis in time for Tuesday's vote. She speaks with Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute, and Robert Pastor of the Center for Democracy and Election Management at American University.
NPR

Is A Law Degree Still Worth It?

A law degree used to pretty much guarantee a stable job. But journalist Elizabeth Lesly Stevens reports that thousands of law students are going into an industry that no longer has room for them. Stevens discusses her article with host Michel Martin, and they hear from NPR Facebook fans about whether a law degree is still worth it.
NPR

A Lesson In Making Math Cool For Girls

Women make up nearly half of the college-educated workforce, but hold less than a quarter of STEM jobs — as in jobs that involve science, technology, engineering and math. Actress turned mathematician Danica McKellar wants to turn those numbers around. She speaks to host Michel Martin about her latest math book for young girls, Girls Get Curves.
NPR

NY Public Housing Residents Hit Hard By Sandy

Nearly a week after superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast, thousands of Americans are still without basics like power and clean water. Host Michel Martin speaks with New York Times reporter Michael Wilson about how some New York Public Housing residents are facing unique challenges in the storm's aftermath.

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