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Atkins Hopes To Ride Paleo, Low-Carb Craze To A Comeback

Atkins Nutritionals says a renewed faith in the low-carb approach to dieting is helping the company grow again. It has launched a low-carb frozen food line and is plowing millions into advertising to win back dieters.
NPR

'A Sense Of Panic,' Says Witness To Navy Yard Shooting

Two people describe escaping a building as a gunman with a rifle shot at them from down the hall.

NPR

Summers' End: A Metaphor For Obama's Economic Agenda

After some initial successes, Obama's ability to achieve the other pieces of his economic to-do list has been spotty at best.
NPR

Teens Curb Sodas And TV, But More Work Needed In Obesity Fight

After a decade of pressure from schools, parents and public health officials, teenagers do seem to be doing a wee bit better when it comes to eating fruits and vegetables and cutting back on sugary drinks. But they've got a long way to go to be considered healthy eaters.
NPR

Birmingham Bombing: 50 Years Later, A Different America?

It's been half a century since the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed. The blast killed four little girls and was a turning point in the civil rights movement. Host Michel Martin revisits that era with historian Taylor Branch.
NPR

Syria: Does The U.S. And Russia Deal Go Far Enough?

The world watches and waits to hear if the Assad government will give up Syria's chemical weapons stock. In the meantime, George Perkovich of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace talks with host Michel Martin about Israel's view on the Syrian conflict.
NPR

Understanding The Wild Child, Or 'Nonconformist' Kid

We all knew the "wild child" in school, the one who couldn't sit still during story time, or raise her hand to speak in class. Elizabeth Weil has written a piece for the New Republic, asking if it's the child's fault, or the education system's. She talks with host Michel Martin.
NPR

Ray Suarez On Latino Americans: Past Is Prologue?

Over 50 million Latin Americans live in the United States. Host Michel Martin speaks with veteran reporter Ray Suarez about his new book Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped A Nation.
NPR

With Summers Out, Will Obama Turn To Yellen For Fed Post?

Financial markets rallied Monday, a day after Lawrence Summers took himself out of the running to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve. Summers had been seen as a front-runner to replace Ben Bernanke, whose term expires in January. Now the focus turns to whether Obama will pick Fed Vice Chairman Janet Yellen to be the first woman to run the central bank.
NPR

Whether Facebook Makes You Lonely Depends On How You Use It

A recent study showed Facebook use makes us feel sadder and lonelier, but other studies show the exact opposite. How you engage with the platform explains the difference.

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