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Sentenced To Death At 16, Indiana Woman Is Now Free

Paula Cooper admitted to killing a Bible studies teacher as part of a robbery in 1985. Back then, Cooper was 15 — and she was 16 when she was sentenced to die.
NPR

Some Colorado Wildfire Evacuees Briefly Allowed Back Into Homes

The Black Forest Fire near Colorado Springs, Colo., has pushed about 4,500 evacuees out of their homes. Police are escorting some of them back in to pick up critical medications or rescue pets.
NPR

High Court Sides With Regulators In Drug Patent Case

The Supreme Court sided with government regulators in an important case involving the pharmaceutical industry and patent law. At issue were contracts between "brand-name" pharmaceutical companies and "generic" producers in which the brand-name company paid the generic not to compete. The court said the Federal Trade Commission could challenge such contracts.
NPR

NSA Leaker Snowden Defends Actions In Live Web Chat

The man who leaked secret National Security Agency documents, Edward Snowden, defended his decision to reveal details of U.S. surveillance programs in a web chat on Monday. Snowden said he's still in Hong Kong and claims he wouldn't get a fair trial in the U.S. He also said he has not been in contact with the Chinese government and that there are more disclosures to come.
NPR

Calif. Wonders About Energy Future After Nuclear Plant Closes

Summer is almost here — and in California that means it's the season to worry about rolling blackouts. There's even more cause for concern this year. The San Onofre nuclear power plant is shutting down for good. It's been off-line for more than a year after a pipe was found leaking radioactive steam. When fully operational, San Onofre produced power for more than a million homes.
NPR

Supreme Court Strikes Down Arizona Voting Law

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down Arizona's requirement that prospective voters provide proof of citizenship to register to vote. But some experts are concerned that the court may have inserted a few "poison pills" in its opinion that would damage voting rights protections down the road.
NPR

G-8 Summit To Tackle Trade, Syria, Slow Economic Growth

President Obama celebrated the unlikely peace process in Northern Ireland on Monday, before attending a G-8 summit where much of the talk is about war in Syria.
NPR

Collection Of Kids' Shoes Carries Message About Gun Violence

Old shoes can tell a story. A mother in New Jersey is hoping her exhibit of old shoes will help young people avoid violence. She's trying to collect a pair of shoes connected to every young person killed by gun violence in the U.S. in 1998 — the year her son was shot to death.
NPR

San Antonio Spurs One Game From Winning Fifth NBA Title

Every time you think you got a handle on this year's NBA Finals, you realize, you have no idea what's going to happen next. Case in point: Before last night's game five against the Miami Heat, San Antonio Spurs guard Manu Ginobili was slumping and supposedly washed up. Instead he put on a vintage performance and led the Spurs to a ten-point victory over the defending champs.
NPR

Wholesale Grocer Accuses Potato Farmers Of Price-Fixing

A wholesale grocer has brought a lawsuit against the United Potato Growers of America claiming they are running an illegal price-fixing cartel. According to the lawsuit the UPGA has gone so far as to employ aerial surveillance to ensure its members are abiding by agreements to reduce the potato supply. Robert Siegel speaks with Associated Press reporter John Miller in Boise, Idaho about the case.

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