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In NCAA Division I Football, Winning Isn't Everything

The college football season got under way Thursday night. In one game, Presbyterian College lost to Wake Forest 31-7. That result was not a surprise. Presbyterian is the smallest football school in Division I. Every year, lower-level Division I schools make a lot of money losing to larger and richer schools.
NPR

Money May Be Motivating Doctors To Do More C-Sections

Many obstetricians make more money for C-sections than for vaginal deliveries. In a recent study, these doctors were more likely to perform the costly procedure than doctors paid a flat salary. But when the pregnant women were also physicians, doctors seemed less swayed by financial incentives.
NPR

Filner's Exit Isn't The End Of San Diego's Mayoral Mayhem

On Friday, embattled Mayor Bob Filner officially steps down. Allegations of sexual harassment against Filner have rocked the eighth-largest American city. Now, San Diegans face a potentially contentious special election in November.
NPR

Dumplings Taste Better When Filled With Memories

Just about every culture has dumplings. For the Polish, it's pierogi, and as Morning Edition editor Renita Jablonski writes, this little dumpling plays a big role for many Polish-Americans in preserving and celebrating their heritage.
NPR

Gulf States Set Plan For Spending Coastal Restoration Funds

Federal and state officials voted Thursday on a plan to restore the Gulf Coast. The meeting in New Orleans is intended to set a course for recovery from the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.
NPR

Treasury, IRS Debut New Tax Rules For Same-Sex Couples

Officials of the Treasury Department and the IRS announced new rules allowing same sex couples who marry in states with gay marriage to file jointly if they move to other states.
NPR

Fast Food Workers, Activists Protest For Higher Wages

The fast food industry has become the focal point in the drive by organized labor and its supporters for so-called living wage laws. Union members and activist groups staged another round of protests Thursday at restaurants and retail stores, calling for a minimum wage of $15 an hour. How are the protestors playing with consumers and what would happen to workers and the industry if organizers achieved their goal?
NPR

NFL Settles Players' Concussions Dispute For $765 Million

The NFL has agreed to a $765 million settlement with more than 4,500 former players and families over concussions. The money will fund medical exams and treatment and provide compensation to players and families.
NPR

Leaked Documents Reveal Budget Breakdown Between CIA, NSA

Details of the top secret budget of U.S. intelligence agencies have been made public — revealing not only that the nation spends more than $50 billion a year on intelligence but also some detail about how that money is spent. The Washington Post published excerpts of a 2013 budget justification obtained from the former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. In the past, the total amount spent on intelligence has been declassified by the U.S. government. The document reveals not only which agency spends the money but also what missions are top priority.
NPR

DOJ Won't Sue To Overturn Recreational Pot Laws

The Department of Justice issued new guidance Thursday on enforcement of marijuana laws. The move comes after two states — Colorado and Washington — legalized marijuana for recreational use. The department said it would not sue to pre-empt those laws as long as the two states follow the new policy, which applies to all 50 states. The government's priorities for prosecutors include keeping drug profits away from gangs and cartels, and keeping marijuana away from children.

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