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Bridging The Cultural Gap With A Mother-In-Law In The Kitchen

My Indian mother-in-law and I didn't have an exact recipe to follow as we forged our relationship. At times it seemed like we might never understand each other, but we cooked together.
NPR

The Congresswoman Whose Husband Called Her Home

Coya Knutson was the first woman elected to Congress from Minnesota. But the charismatic farmer's daughter saw her political career derailed by one of the worst dirty tricks ever.
NPR

New Rules Aim To Streamline GOP's 2016 Nominating Process

If there are other Herman Cains and Michele Bachmanns out there with 2016 presidential hopes, new RNC rules may make it harder for them to go from "who?" to Republican presidential contenders.
NPR

Judge Strikes Down Arkansas Ban On Gay Marriage

The move clears the way for gay couples to wed in the state. Democratic Attorney General Dustin McDaniel's office is expected to appeal the decision to the state Supreme Court.
NPR

Under Restructured Rules, Kansas Teachers Lose Tenure

Kansas lawmakers a bill that will take away some of the employment protections offered to teachers. Teachers argue this will allow them to be fired for unfair reasons.
NPR

Home-Wrecker: Woman Doesn't Like Neighbors, Demolishes Their Home

Ana Maria Moreta Folch said she was doing her neighborhood in St. Johns County, Fla., a favor. She was charged with criminal mischief, a third-degree felony, and released on $10,000 bail.
NPR

Faced With Pentagon Budget Cuts, Congress Finesses The Numbers

The Pentagon's congressionally-imposed budget cuts ran into a powerful opponent this week: Congress itself. The House Armed Services Committee rejected $5 billion worth of proposed cuts.
NPR

To End Addiction Epidemic, States Focus On Stopping Doctor Shoppers

Nearly every state has a prescription drug monitoring program that's meant to end abuse of opioids and other powerful pain medicines. But many of these programs have a big loophole: they're voluntary.
NPR

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

The National Park Service says that an 89-year-old Navajo elder will be the last to live at Wupatki National Monument. Stella Peshlakai Smith's family faces eviction when she dies.
NPR

The Tale Of 3 Stolen Trees And A Community In Bloom

After three fruit trees were stolen from a Boise cathedral's orchard, the community donated so many trees that the orchard doubled in size. Joe Prin, the cathedral's superintendent, tells the story.

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