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Illinois House Approves Bill Paving Way For Gay Marriage

Illinois is now poised to become the 15th state to legalize same-sex marriage. The House was the bill's biggest hurdle; the state's Democratic governor and the Senate support the measure.
NPR

Silenced By Status, Farm Workers Face Rape, Sexual Abuse

Farm workers do backbreaking work to bring fresh produce to our tables. But one secret about life in the fields is a chilling power dynamic that can allow supervisors to sexually assault farm workers in remote orchards and packinghouses.
NPR

Fla. School District Trying To Curb School-To-Prison Pipeline

A Florida school district reached an agreement with the NAACP and law enforcement to reassess tough "zero tolerance" guidelines. Non-violent misdemeanors — like alcohol and marijuana possession — will be dealt with by schools instead of police.
NPR

Apple's Decision To Make Glass In Arizona Will Create Hundreds Of Jobs

Technology giant Apple is buying a large manufacturing space in Arizona, where high-tech glass for its devices will be produced. The move is being hailed in Arizona, where the economy remains slowed by the U.S. housing market crisis.
NPR

Beleaguered Florida Citrus Industry Hits New Snags

Florida's citrus industry is having more problems. Growers are already plagued by crop diseases like canker and greening. Now, an effort to control greening has led to the deaths of millions of bees.
NPR

The Los Angeles Aqueduct Just Turned 100

Audie Cornish talks to David Ulin, a The Los Angeles Times book critic who wrote an essay for Boom magazine on a famous William Mulholland speech about the 100-year-old engineering marvel that is the Los Angeles Aqueduct. The aqueduct brought water from the Owens Valley hundreds of miles away to a growing area in need of additional resources to sustain its people and their endeavors, helping spur an economy that today rivals that of many nations. A century later, this gravity-fed system continues to be a major source of water for Angelenos, supplying about half of the water needs for four million people on an average year.
NPR

Outrage In Pakistan After U.S. Drone Strike Kills Taliban Leader

Melissa Block talks with Gibran Peshimam, political editor for The Express Tribune in Karachi, about reaction in Pakistan to last week's American drone strike that killed the Pakistani Taliban leader.
NPR

Love Triangle Case Puts Chemical Weapons Treaty To The Test

The power of the president and Congress to make treaties and enforce state compliance has been called into question in a case involving a woman who may have violated the chemical weapons treaty in an effort to poison her husband's mistress. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case Tuesday.
NPR

Omaha Man Re-United With Stolen Motorcycle 46 Years Later

A motorcycle owner in Omaha, Neb., reported his bike stolen from his backyard. Now, it's on its way home after turning up at the Port of Los Angeles, 46 years later.
NPR

Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

Parts of the U.S. and Canada have seen a rapid decline in moose populations that may be linked to climate change. And, scientists and hunters warn, those declines have often been accompanied by a surge of infestations of the winter tick.

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