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The Los Angeles Aqueduct Just Turned 100

Audie Cornish talks to David Ulin, a The Los Angeles Times book critic who wrote an essay for Boom magazine on a famous William Mulholland speech about the 100-year-old engineering marvel that is the Los Angeles Aqueduct. The aqueduct brought water from the Owens Valley hundreds of miles away to a growing area in need of additional resources to sustain its people and their endeavors, helping spur an economy that today rivals that of many nations. A century later, this gravity-fed system continues to be a major source of water for Angelenos, supplying about half of the water needs for four million people on an average year.
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Outrage In Pakistan After U.S. Drone Strike Kills Taliban Leader

Melissa Block talks with Gibran Peshimam, political editor for The Express Tribune in Karachi, about reaction in Pakistan to last week's American drone strike that killed the Pakistani Taliban leader.
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Love Triangle Case Puts Chemical Weapons Treaty To The Test

The power of the president and Congress to make treaties and enforce state compliance has been called into question in a case involving a woman who may have violated the chemical weapons treaty in an effort to poison her husband's mistress. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case Tuesday.
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Omaha Man Re-United With Stolen Motorcycle 46 Years Later

A motorcycle owner in Omaha, Neb., reported his bike stolen from his backyard. Now, it's on its way home after turning up at the Port of Los Angeles, 46 years later.
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Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

Parts of the U.S. and Canada have seen a rapid decline in moose populations that may be linked to climate change. And, scientists and hunters warn, those declines have often been accompanied by a surge of infestations of the winter tick.
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As City Grapples With Murder Rate, Police Chief Reaches Out

Gary, Ind., just experienced its 43rd homicide this year — all while the city is trying to get a handle on long-standing problems within its police department. Internal troubles aside, Gary's police chief has made a point of personally connecting with the families of each murder victim.
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Charlie Trotter, Famous Chicago Chef, Has Died At 54

Famous for his quest to fill three daily tasting menus with innovative dishes, Trotter helped bring a new dimension to fine dining in Chicago and beyond when he opened his restaurant in 1987.
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Wondering If You Need A Strep Test? Crowdsourcing Might Help

A fever, lack of cough, and sick neighbors could help you assess your strep status at home. By measuring how many people have strep in the community, researchers say it could be much easier to figure out when it's time to go for the lab test.
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Police Weren't 'Minutes' Behind Los Angeles Shooting Suspect

More information is coming in about what happened at Los Angeles International Airport and the young man suspected of killing at TSA officer and wounding several other people. Early headlines about warnings concerning Paul Ciancia's mental state and efforts to find him appear to have been wrong.
NPR

Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.

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