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Some Maryland Residents Feel Forgotten After Sandy

Hurricane Sandy focused most of its devastation on New Jersey and New York, but it also decimated the town of Crisfield, Md. The community is one of the state's poorest, and residents say they're being forgotten in the effort to bring aid to other places hit by the storm.
NPR

Black Voters Reflect On Obama's First Term

In just over a month, President Obama will be sworn in for his second term. Audie Cornish takes a moment to look back at what his presidency has meant for African-Americans. We hear from a comedian, David Alan Grier; from a lawmaker, Emanuel Cleaver, who is outgoing chair of the Congressional Black Caucus; and from three seniors at Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C.
NPR

Washington To Begin Its Grand Experiment With Pot

Washington state's recreational pot law goes into effect on Thursday. But the state has a year to set up a system to regulate the production and sale of marijuana.
NPR

As Two States Legalize Pot, Tommy Chong Isn't Nostalgic About The Old Days

Washington state decriminalizes possession tonight. Colorado does so next month. Chong, one half of the stoner duo Cheech and Chong, is all in favor of the new laws. There isn't anything funny about being busted, the comic says.
NPR

How Helpful Is Extending Unemployment Benefits?

About 2 million Americans could lose unemployment checks if Congress doesn't extend emergency federal benefits by the end of the year. Host Michel Martin talks about new research challenging conventional wisdom about unemployment checks. Guests include James Sherk of the Heritage Foundation and Judy Conti of the National Employment Law Project.
NPR

Grading Kids Based On Race

Some public schools across the U.S. are setting different standards for students based on their race. The goal is to cut the achievement gap in half. Host Michel Martin speaks with Emily Richmond, of the Education Writers Association, about criticisms to this approach.
NPR

Make Your Mark On Austin's Music Map

Residents of Austin, Texas, like to think of their city as the live music capital of the world. A new effort is putting some of the city's well-known and surprising venues on an interactive map. Host Michel Martin learns more from Delaney Hall, one of the producers of the Austin Music Map.
NPR

Buying Freedom Through Dressmaking

The new movie 'Lincoln' explores the last months of Abraham Lincoln's life and sheds light on prominent figures of the time. One lesser-known person is former slave Elizabeth Keckley. She became a close confidante to Mary Todd Lincoln. Host Michel Martin speaks with professor Clarence Lusane about Keckley's contributions to American history.
NPR

'NY Post' Photographer: I Was Too Far Away To Reach Man Hit By Train

The horrifying image of a man's final moments before being hit by a subway train has sparked controversy. The Post has been criticized for publishing it. The photographer has been criticized for taking it. He's now talking about the effort he says he made to reach the victim.

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