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How Court's Bus Ruling Sealed Differences In Detroit Schools

It's been 40 years since the Supreme Court accepted what became a landmark case about school desegregation. The case was controversial because it involved busing students between a largely African-American city — Detroit — and its white suburban areas.
NPR

Midwest Tornadoes Send Residents Scrambling

The cleanup continues across the Midwest, where dozens of tornadoes struck on Sunday. The Illinois town of Washington appears to have been hardest hit. The mayor says as many as 500 homes were damaged or destroyed by a tornado that cut a path about an eighth of a mile wide from one side of the town to the other.
NPR

Bitcoin Hits Record High After Senate Panel Told It's Legal

The cyber-currency was at the center of a Senate panel hearing Monday. Senators are looking into the way Bitcoin was used by the illegal drug marketplace that called itself Silk Road. But even with the scrutiny, Bitcoin investors drove the virtual currency to record highs.
NPR

After Floods, Some Colo. Rivers Aren't Where They Used To Be

The historic Colorado floods actually changed the course of some rivers and creeks. That has left many agricultural irrigation ditches and diversion dams useless. Farmers and irrigation companies now find themselves footing the bill to reroute these waterways before spring planting season.
NPR

'You Just Get Used To It': An LA Commuter's Diary

About 10 percent of working Americans carpool to work. For two years, Neville Amaria was one of them. He spent two to three hours a day in the car with as many as four co-workers squeezed in alongside him. Now his office has moved closer to home. Here's an audio diary from the last morning of his carpool.
NPR

A New Life For An Old Slave Jail

Lewis Henry Bailey was freed from slavery in Texas and began his journey back to Virginia by foot 150 years ago. The jail where he was sold to slave dealers as a child is now a museum and the offices of a local Urban League chapter just outside of the nation's capital.
NPR

Technology Outpacing Policymakers, Needs Of NSA

The controversy over the National Security Agency's surveillance programs has exposed a problem in the oversight of those programs. Changes to adapt have come so fast that legislators, judges, policymakers and technology firms can't keep up, and major gaps have appeared in policymaking and legislating.
NPR

Wisconsin Chooses Its Own Path To Overhaul Medicaid

Wisconsin is taking a unique path on Medicare. The state's Republican governor rejected federal funds to expand Medicaid coverage. But Wisconsin is also bringing more people into Medicaid while moving others to private insurance on the health exchanges under the Affordable Care Act.
NPR

Little-Known Immigration Mandate Keeps Detention Beds Full

A congressional directive requires U.S. detention centers to fill 34,000 beds per night. Supporters say it ensures that the nation's immigration laws are being enforced. But critics say housing a fixed number of immigrants at any given time is inhumane, inefficient and too expensive.
NPR

Political Rookie Pulls Off Surprise Win In Louisiana

GOP businessman Vance McAllister, a political newcomer, handily defeated Republican state Sen. Neil Riser in a special election that tested two different GOP approaches to Obamacare.

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