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Another Republican Hopes For Upset In Mass. Senate Race

Businessman and former Navy SEAL Gabriel Gomez is trying to pull off a win in Tuesday's special election to fill John Kerry's Senate seat — like Republican Scott Brown's surprising special election victory in 2010. But polls show Gomez trailing veteran Democratic Rep. Ed Markey.
NPR

Among Conservatives, Concerns Grow Over New School Standards

Forty-six states and Washington, D.C., have signed on to the Common Core State Standards, a set of K-12 standards meant to ensure that students are reaching the same learning benchmarks nationwide. But as states begin implementing the standards, many conservatives have come out against them.
NPR

Affirmative Action Ruling A Win For Policy's Advocates

Robert Siegel talks with Columbia University president Lee Bollinger. As president of the University of Michigan, Bollinger led the litigation in Grutter v. Bollinger, the 2003 Supreme Court case whose precedent permitting affirmative action admissions policies was upheld by Monday's ruling.
NPR

High Court Sides With Employers In Discrimination Suits

The Supreme Court sided with employers in two harassment and discrimination cases. One case turned on whether one employee was another's supervisor, the other on whether the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center was justified in withdrawing an offer of employment.
NPR

NSA Leaker Sets Sights On South America, But Why Ecuador?

Edward Snowden is still on the run after admitting he leaked NSA secrets. He's believed to be in Russia still but his exact whereabouts are still unknown. On Monday, officials from Ecuador said Snowden has applied for asylum there. Ecuador is the same country that provided sanctuary for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for more than a year in its London Embassy. So what makes Ecuador a safe haven for self-proclaimed whistle blowers?
NPR

Congress Not Likely To Pass Sweeping Climate Legislation

As President Obama prepares to unveil his executive strategy on climate change, we look at the politics of the issue in Congress.
NPR

U.S. Faces Major Diplomatic Challenge In Extraditing Snowden

The U.S. is urging countries around the world to return a former intelligence contractor, who was last seen in Hong Kong. The State Department revoked Edward Snowden's passport, but the man accused of releasing American secrets is on the run. And there seem to be plenty of countries, including Russia, willing to hide him in spite of U.S. appeals.
NPR

Border Security Vote A Barometer For Immigration Bill's Chances

The Senate is voting Monday on a key amendment to the immigration bill that dramatically increases border security enforcement. The change is designed to attract more Republicans and give the proposal a strong vote later in the week.
NPR

Justices Seek 'Strict Scrutiny' In Affirmative Action Case

On Monday, the Supreme Court sent the University of Texas affirmative action case back to the lower court, admonishing it to get it right — and make sure affirmative action programs are narrowly tailored.
NPR

IRS Report: Tea Party Groups Weren't The Only Ones Targeted

The "be on the lookout list" used to flag Tea Party groups for extra scrutiny of their tax-exemption applications was not the only one the Internal Revenue Service had been using — there were others, covering a "broad spectrum" of groups and causes, according to an IRS report released Monday.

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