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FCC Proposes AM Radio Changes To Give The Band A Boost

AM radio was what folks used to gather around to listen to soap operas, big bands and live drama. Later, it's where baby boomers heard the Beatles. Now, it's largely the province of news and talk — and often hard to hear because of interference. The FCC is proposing some changes it hopes will make the AM band relevant again.
NPR

Illinois Approves Rescue Of Its Ailing Pension System

The bill would cut benefits and push back the retirement age for younger workers in an effort to close a $100 billion shortfall. The governor has said he will sign it, but the state's public employee unions bitterly oppose it.
NPR

Lawmakers In Name Only? Congress Reaches Productivity Lows

In terms of enacting laws, the current Congress is on course to be the least productive in modern times. Some House members think the lack of legislative activity is a positive development.
NPR

Obama Offers Second Chance For Missouri Court Nominee

President Obama quietly nominated Ronnie White, who was rejected for a federal judgeship in 1999, to the bench last month. Experts say they can't remember a time when a judge who's been voted down in the Senate has been renominated.
NPR

Mammograms In 3-D May Be Better, But Hard Proof Is Missing

A new kind of mammogram that takes many X-rays to make a three-dimensional image can help doctors find cancer and reduce false alarms. But it's still unclear who might benefit from the technique, and whether it's worth the higher cost and double dose of radiation.
NPR

Guardian Editor: We've Published 1 Percent Of Snowden Files

In testimony before Britain's Parliament, Alan Rusbridger tells lawmakers that about 58,000 files obtained from Snowden, or "about 1 percent," have been published by the paper.
NPR

Seahawks Fans Cause Earthquake, Set Noise Record

During Seattle's 34-7 win over New Orleans, the home team's fans went wild. They stomped so hard that a nearby seismometer's needle moved. Meanwhile, the noise at CenturyLink Field was louder than a jet engine.
NPR

Train Engineer 'Nodded At Controls,' Official Says

Four people were killed and more than 60 were injured when the commuter train derailed Sunday. Investigators say they've found no problems with its brakes. They reported earlier that it entered a curve going 82 mph — more than 50 mph more than the speed limit.
NPR

Biden Arrives In Beijing As Trouble Brews Over The East China Sea

Vice President Joe Biden arrives in Beijing tonight from Tokyo, part of an Asian tour that has been dominated by tensions in the East China Sea. Both Japan and the U.S. have deplored China's new air defense identification zone, which covers an area that includes disputed islands under Japanese control.
NPR

For First Time, Americans Say U.S. Power In The World Is Declining

For the first time in 40 years, a majority of Americans say that the U.S. plays a less important and powerful role as a world leader than it did a decade ago, according to Pew's America's Place in the World poll. The Pew poll also finds that more Americans disapprove than approve of President Obama's handling of foreign policy. Robert Siegel talks about the poll results with Michael Dimock, director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, to make sense of what the results might mean.

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