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Lawyer Rejects Guantanamo 'Fifty Shades Of Grey' Claim

Weeks after detainees at Guantanamo Bay were said to be voracious readers of Fifty Shades of Grey, an attorney says his client was given a copy by guards at the prison and had never heard of it before.
NPR

Bradley Manning: 'I Am A Female,' Call Me Chelsea

The Army private responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history is asking for hormone therapy. Manning's lawyer will push for that to happen during the soldier's long stay in prison.
NPR

Speculation Builds That San Diego Mayor Is On His Way Out

Democratic Mayor Bob Filner has reached a tentative deal to settle a lawsuit brought by one of the women who accuses him of sexual harassment. Details of the deal, which must be approved by the city council, have not been released. The Union-Tribune, though, says it sets the stage for his departure.
NPR

Bank Of America To Close Some Drive-Up Tellers

Bank of America says too few people are using drive-through teller windows. So, the bank is cutting that service at some branches. Teller lanes from Georgia to Texas have already closed.
NPR

Closing Arguments Begin Thursday In Fort Hood Shooting Trial

The court martial of Army Major Nidal Hasan is heading into its final phases at Fort Hood in Texas. Hasan has elected to offer no defense. Closing arguments begin Thursday morning, and then the case is set to go to the jury. Hasan faces the death penalty, accused of massacring 13 people and shooting 32 others.
NPR

Lawyers For Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales To Ask For Leniency

The sentencing hearing for Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales continues near Tacoma, Wash. He's pleaded guilty to attacking two Afghan villages last year, massacring 16 men, women and children. Because of the guilty plea, Bales is guaranteed a life sentence. The only question is whether he'll have a chance at parole.
NPR

FISA Court: NSA Surveillance Program Was Unconstitutional

The National Security Agency illegally collected emails of tens of thousands of Americans. The numbers are revealed in a newly declassified secret court opinion. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court found the collection of those emails unconstitutional and ordered the NSA to fix the problem.
NPR

New York City Council To Vote On Tough Police Oversight Laws

Thursday's vote comes just weeks after a federal judge ruled the NYPD violated the civil rights of minorities. But Mayor Michael Bloomberg refuses to back down. He's appealing the judge's ruling, and working to block the council bills as well.
NPR

Writer William T. Vollmann Uncovers His FBI File

David Greene talks to author Willam T. Vollmann about this latest article in Harpers Magazine. In it, Vollmann details his discovery, following a Freedom of Information Act request, that the FBI was watching him, and that he was suspected of being a domestic terrorist.
NPR

Future Historians: Good Luck Sifting Through Obama Video

While a photographer has been an official part of the White House staff since John F. Kennedy was president, an official videographer is something new. Scholars say the thousands of hours of behind-the-scenes footage could be a vital resource, but it may not be very easy to use.

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