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Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Fifty years ago, J.T. Johnson and Al Lingo jumped into a whites-only pool in Florida as part of a civil rights protest. They were taken to jail — after the hotel owner poured acid into the water.
NPR

Here's One Big Way Your Mobile Phone Could Be Open To Hackers

Unsecure Wi-Fi networks have been a well-known vulnerability in the tech industry for years. They can let even an unsophisticated hacker capture your traffic and possibly steal your identity.
NPR

Pew Poll: More Americans Are Political Purists

Over the past 20 years, Americans who are politically in the middle of the road have lost ground to more ideological hard-liners, a new Pew Research Center survey shows.
NPR

Supreme Court: Inherited IRAs Not Protected From Bankruptcy

The court agreed with a bankruptcy court's ruling that an inherited IRA represented "an opportunity for current consumption, not a fund of retirement savings."
NPR

POM Wonderful Wins A Round In Food Fight With Coca-Cola

By a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court ruled that POM Wonderful's lawsuit against the Coca-Cola Co. may go on. The repercussions of the case for the food and beverage industry are unclear.
NPR

The Big Numbers Behind Eric Cantor's Failed Primary Bid

Political action committees poured cash into the House majority leader's campaign, posting big contributions in the final days of the race. Tea Party-backed challenger David Brat was all but ignored.
NPR

Q&A: Nintendo President Says Don't Count Out Mario

The once-powerful name in gaming has been relegated to third-place status in recent years. Nintendo of America chief Reggie Fils-Aime says Mario and other franchises are key to the company's future.
NPR

Starbucks Makes Itself More Addictive With Wireless Phone Charging

If you have a capable device, no more cords or outlets required to charge your smartphone — not at Starbucks locations, anyway.
NPR

Are 'Color Revolutions' A New Front In U.S.-Russia Tensions?

Moscow has been talking lately about "color revolutions" as a new form of warfare employed by the West. The name comes from the Orange and Rose Revolutions in Ukraine and Georgia, respectively, but it's now being applied to popular rebellions such as those in Egypt and Syria. While Russia accuses the West of this kind of subversion, it seems to be following the same playbook in eastern Ukraine.
NPR

The Jury Is Still Out On Why O.J. Simpson Was Acquitted

Twenty years after O.J. Simpson was accused of murdering his ex-wife and her male friend, reverberations from his trial and acquittal still ripple through Los Angeles.

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