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They Call The Election A Horse Race; It Has Real Bettors, Too

While pundits clamor to predict the outcome of the presidential election, they would be hard pressed to beat the record of betting markets. It's illegal for Americans to bet on the outcome of an election, but there are several "prediction markets" where they can put money down on a candidate.
NPR

A Big Texan Reflects On 'Big Tex'

An early morning fire all but destroyed the iconic "Big Tex" statue at the Texas State Fair on Friday. The news reached all the way in Nairobi, Kenya, where John Burnett is currently based.
NPR

Marriage Law Likely Headed To Supreme Court

A federal appeals court ruling has catapulted a New York case to the head of the line, as the Supreme Court considers which of many cases it should use to decide whether the Defense of Marriage Act is constitutional. The case involves a widow who paid taxes on her same-sex spouse's estate.
NPR

Senate Hopefuls Make Final Pitches

Candidates in tight Senate races across the U.S. squared off Thursday night for their final debates before Election Day. We hear excerpts from three of them: Missouri, Virginia and Connecticut.
NPR

It's All Politics, Oct. 18, 2012

Presidential debate No. 2 is in the books, and the consensus is that — unlike debate No. 1 — President Obama came prepared for battle. For all the talk about "binders full of women," and what was said when after the events in Benghazi, Libya, Obama and Mitt Romney both made their cases. NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin have the latest political roundup.
NPR

Making Sense Of Presidential Polls

In less than a month, the 2012 presidential election turned from an almost certain victory for President Obama to a neck-and-neck race. New York Times blogger and statistician Nate Silver and Princeton neuroscientist Sam Wang talk about making sense of the polls--and why not all votes are created equal.
NPR

Young Mormon Women 'Thrilled' By New Mission Age

The Mormon church recently lowered the age at which members can start serving their missions. The minimum age for women used to be age 21, now it's 19. That may not sound like a big difference, but the change has been hailed as a 'giant leap' by Mormon bloggers. Host Michel Martin looks at what the decision will mean for young women with Joanna Brooks, author of The Book of Mormon Girl, and Emily Jensen of Deseret News.
NPR

Sugar Beet Labor Battles Spill Out Onto The National Stage

Sugar production is as close to a planned economy as anything you'll find in America. But there are cracks in the system. Union leaders are calling for a boycott of one of the country's leading sugar producers, which has locked out 1,300 workers.
NPR

New York Officials Insist Stop-And-Frisk Is Legal

A judge in New York City is holding hearings on the controversial NYPD practice known as stop-and-frisk. This case focuses only on stops that take place in privately-owned apartment buildings. It's the first of three major legal challenges to stop-and-frisk to make it to court.

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