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Bay Area's Steep Housing Costs Spark Return To Communal Living

Young professionals "co-living" in San Francisco-area mansions say they're doing more than cutting costs and promoting sustainability — they're building communities, and tech-powered social networking makes it easier.
NPR

This Stanford Ph.D. Became A Fruit Picker To Feed California's Hungry

Sarah Ramirez left a high-prestige career to bring California's bounty of unsellable fruit to food banks in the state's Central Valley. Her grassroots organization is trying to address a regional conundrum: While many area farms end up with imperfect fruit that can't be sold to supermarkets, local farmworkers struggle to afford fresh produce.
NPR

Obama's Jab At Russia In Keeping With Olympic Tradition

President Obama is staying home from next year's Winter Games, sending openly gay athletes instead to scold Russia for its anti-gay policies. This isn't the first time politics has intruded on the Olympics. Although the games are intended to be an apolitical athletic gathering, they have frequently provided a platform for protest.
NPR

Push For Release Of CIA Interrogation Report Continues

Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee are pressing for the release of a so-called torture report on Bush-era interrogation practices. But there are several hurdles to clear before portions of the report might become declassified.
NPR

In One NYC School, A Snapshot Of Bloomberg's Education Legacy

Since he took office, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has closed and consolidated schools, created hundreds of new ones and championed the use of data to measure performance. Washington Irving High School, scheduled to close in 2015, offers a window on the changes he's brought to the city's vast school system.
NPR

Top SAC Capital Manager Guilty Of Insider Trading

Michael Steinberg, the highest-ranking employee at the hedge fund to be convicted in an insider trading sweep, was found guilty on five counts of conspiracy and securities fraud.
NPR

A Tiny Taper, In 2 Graphs

In the past five years, the Fed has created $3 trillion out of thin air. In that context, today's news is vanishingly small.
NPR

Senate Approves Budget Deal, Reducing Chances Of A Shutdown

The deal, with much less drama than past spending votes, is OK'd by a simple majority nearly a week after the House approved the measure.
NPR

Obama, Biden Won't Go To 2014 Olympics, But Gay Athletes Will

LGBT activists are hailing the Obama administration's choice of a delegation to attend the Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. It doesn't include the President or Vice President or their wives or even cabinet secretaries. Instead the delegation includes prominent gay athletes. This is seen as a rebuke of Russia's new anti-propaganda law that targets those who are LGBT.
NPR

White House Releases Report On NSA Surveillance Program

A review panel convened by the White House has released its report on surveillance by the National Security Agency. The panel is one of several reviews of U.S. intelligence policy following leaks by former contractor Edward Snowden.

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