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Why Colleges Adjudicate Their Own Campus Crimes

Colleges are under scrutiny for bungling recent sexual assault cases. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to correspondent Tovia Smith about why schools and not police typically handle these cases.
NPR

The History of Campus Sexual Assault

Sixty years of research on campus rape yields scholarly insight into prevention and accountability.
NPR

For Some Uninsured, Simply Signing Up Is A Challenge

Leaburn Alexander works two jobs and has a monstrous commute. There's no wiggle room in his budget to pay a health insurance premium — and no time even to meet with an enrollment counselor.
NPR

Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson Resigns

Wilson, the Ferguson police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown nearly four months ago, writes in a resignation letter that he hopes stepping down will "allow the community to heal."
NPR

Millennials Might Be 'Generation Twin.' Is That A Bad Thing?

Between 1981 and 2012, 1 million extra twins were born in the U.S. One economist says all of those twins could be hurting the economy — but another expert points out some perks of twinhood.
NPR

'The Banh Mi Handbook': A Guide To A Viet-French Sandwich

Food writer Andrea Nguyen dives into the story of banh mi, a Vietnamese street sandwich with a French colonial past that's been popping up on menus around the country.
NPR

Some Colleges Revisiting Admission Policies For Transgender Students

Dozens of women's colleges are grappling with the challenge of how to define policies for transgender students. NPR's Eric Westervelt speaks with Wellesly graduate Alex Poon about his experience as a trans-man on campus.
NPR

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Mark Strand Dies At 80

The Canadian-born poet was known for his wit and introspection. He also won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and Yale University's Bollingen Prize.
NPR

A Musical Tribute For A Waiter Who Spoke Out Against Racism

Fifty years after the desegregation of the South, an oratorio will pay tribute to an unlikely civil rights activist — a waiter named Booker Wright who spoke out about discrimination on the job.
NPR

Jesus Started A Chain Letter — And Other Hoaxes

After Jesus died, he supposedly wrote a letter to Earth. A copy of that letter is now on display, along with other historic fakes and forgeries including a famous — and bogus — anti-Semitic tract.

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