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Clay Aiken's Political Reality: Results Mixed For Stars Like Him

The former American Idol runner-up set the political class chattering Friday with rumors that he may run for Congress. He's one in a line of reality stars who have aimed for public office.
NPR

Couples Urge Sotomayor To Deny Utah's Bid To Block Gay Marriage

The couples' response comes three days after Utah officials asked Justice Sonia Sotomayor to block same-sex marriages in the state. Their filing with the Supreme Court calls the prospect of a delay "an intolerable and dehumanizing burden."
NPR

7 Political Dates To Watch In 2014

The year ahead offers much more political catnip than 2013. Aside from a full roster of House, Senate and gubernatorial races, 2014 is shaping up as another critical period for the Affordable Care Act.
NPR

Ford Tops Resurgent U.S. Car Industry, 2013 Sales Results Show

Ford and GM are calling 2013 the best year for U.S. auto sales in at least five years, as they report double-digit annual gains. Chrysler reported an increase of 9 percent, its strongest year since 2007.
NPR

5 Things That Could Alter The Perception Of Obamacare

Insurance enrollment will be a key yardstick for assessing whether the Affordable Care Act is working. Almost as important as the total number of people who get coverage is whether a significant percentage of them are healthy.
NPR

New Year, New Health Care Plans ... Can Doctors Keep Up?

Thousands of Americans rang in 2014 with new insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. But will doctors and hospitals start feeling the crunch? Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington Post health reporter Sarah Kliff.
NPR

Could Salary Bump Mean Economic Slump?

Minimum wage workers in 13 states will see a bump in their paychecks this year. Host Michel Martin talks about the possible ripple effects of raising minimum wages. She's joined by Bloomberg Businessweek contributor Roben Farzad and NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax.
NPR

Tough Lessons For Teachers Of Color

Teachers of color leave the profession 24 percent more often than white teachers, according to a study from the University of Pennsylvania. Amanda Machado wrote about why she quit teaching in a recent article for The Atlantic. Host Michel Martin speaks with her about that decision, and the challenges that teachers of color face.
NPR

Nuns' Objection To Health Care Law Is Unwarranted, Justice Dept. Says

Religious organizations have objected to the new health care law's requirement that employers include contraception coverage in the insurance plans they offer employees. But the Obama administration says one group of nuns is already exempt and has no standing to object.
NPR

Northeast Hit With Snow And Powerful Winds

A very cold winter storm is engulfing much of the Northeast, dumping more than 20 inches of snow in some areas and bringing strong winds along with it. Schools are closed in Boston and New York City. Thousands of flights have been canceled. Officials around the region are asking people to stay home and let road crews do their work.

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