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Regulators Approve Deal Between Delta, Virgin Atlantic

Delta Airlines has just completed its purchase of 49 percent of Virgin Atlantic. Beginning early next month, the two airlines will begin marketing each others flights. They hope to become a formidable competitor on transatlantic routes.
NPR

IRS Systematically Targeted 'Progressive' Groups Too

It wasn't just Tea Party groups that had a "be on the lookout" list at the IRS. A "broad spectrum" of groups were also targeted for increased scrutiny on other lists, which the agency has stopped using under its new acting leader Danny Werfel.
NPR

Court Rulings Complicate Discrimination Suits For Employees

In two big employment law cases, the U.S. Supreme Court has made it harder for employees to bring discrimination suits about workplace harassment and retaliation.
NPR

Senate Adds Border Security Measure To Immigration Bill

The Senate has taken another step toward approving a sweeping immigration overhaul, as the legislation passed an essential test Monday evening. By a vote of 67-27, the chamber voted to include an amendment on border security to the final bill, and to avoid a filibuster.
NPR

Author Richard Matheson, 'I Am Legend' Writer, Dies At 87

Science fiction author Richard Matheson's work included The Shrinking Man, I Am Legend, and numerous TV and movie scripts. For five decades, his work injected a sense of humanity into science fiction.
NPR

Another Republican Hopes For Upset In Mass. Senate Race

Businessman and former Navy SEAL Gabriel Gomez is trying to pull off a win in Tuesday's special election to fill John Kerry's Senate seat — like Republican Scott Brown's surprising special election victory in 2010. But polls show Gomez trailing veteran Democratic Rep. Ed Markey.
NPR

Among Conservatives, Concerns Grow Over New School Standards

Forty-six states and Washington, D.C., have signed on to the Common Core State Standards, a set of K-12 standards meant to ensure that students are reaching the same learning benchmarks nationwide. But as states begin implementing the standards, many conservatives have come out against them.
NPR

Affirmative Action Ruling A Win For Policy's Advocates

Robert Siegel talks with Columbia University president Lee Bollinger. As president of the University of Michigan, Bollinger led the litigation in Grutter v. Bollinger, the 2003 Supreme Court case whose precedent permitting affirmative action admissions policies was upheld by Monday's ruling.
NPR

High Court Sides With Employers In Discrimination Suits

The Supreme Court sided with employers in two harassment and discrimination cases. One case turned on whether one employee was another's supervisor, the other on whether the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center was justified in withdrawing an offer of employment.
NPR

NSA Leaker Sets Sights On South America, But Why Ecuador?

Edward Snowden is still on the run after admitting he leaked NSA secrets. He's believed to be in Russia still but his exact whereabouts are still unknown. On Monday, officials from Ecuador said Snowden has applied for asylum there. Ecuador is the same country that provided sanctuary for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for more than a year in its London Embassy. So what makes Ecuador a safe haven for self-proclaimed whistle blowers?

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