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Paul Lo, From Hmong Refugee To California Judge

Paul Lo spent part of his childhood in a refugee camp in Thailand. Now he has been appointed as a judge on the Merced County Superior Court in California. That reportedly makes him the first Hmong-American judge in U.S. history. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lo about his unusual path to the bench.
NPR

Photos May Show Marines Burning Iraqis' Bodies

The Marine Corps is looking into images obtained by the entertainment website TMZ. They appear to show U.S. Marines burning the corpses of Iraqi fighters during the 2004 battles in Fallujah.
NPR

Vatican Comes Under U.N. Scrutiny Over Priest Abuse Scandal

The Committee on the Rights of the Child takes church officials to task for their handling of sex abuse allegations, saying the Holy See must "take all appropriate measures" to keep children safe.
NPR

Colleges Guide Low-Income Students From Getting In To Graduating

An education summit at the White House focuses on finding new ways to help poor students succeed. "The dirty little secret of American higher education is that universities care about racial diversity and do a good job of trying to promote that, but they completely ignore the issue of socioeconomic diversity," says one scholar.
NPR

34 Officers At Nuclear Site May Have Cheated On Exams

An investigation into alleged drug use by officers led to evidence that some had also been sharing answers to proficiency exams, the Air Force says. The 34 who allegedly were involved have been suspended. It's the latest in a string of scandals for the nuclear missile launch command.
NPR

Hal Faulkner, Marine Whose Last Wish Was An Honorable Discharge, Dies

In 1956, Faulkner was given an "undesirable" discharge because he was gay. About a year ago, Faulkner learned he had terminal cancer. The Marines expedited a change in his status and earlier this month Faulkner's discharge was changed to "honorable." He died Tuesday at the age of 79.
NPR

Investors Confuse Nestor With Nest

A Rhode Island company called Nestor sells traffic enforcement systems and this week a blogger revealed its stock was soaring far beyond expectations. Nestor is traded under the stock market abbreviation NEST. Investors confused Nestor with a tech company called Nest, which is being sold to Google for billions of dollars.
NPR

Brain Training Results In Older Adults Can Last For Years

A large scale study of older adults shows that specialized training in cognitive skills, like memory and reasoning, not only gets results, but the impacts can last up to 10 years.
NPR

How Perverse Incentives Drive Up Health Care Costs

Medical treatment in the emergency room is expensive, but there's a perverse incentive at work which encourages EMS workers to send more people there. Medicare reimburses for 911 calls only if the patient is transported to the ER. A pilot program at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City tries to keep patients from coming back to the ER.
NPR

Concerns Raised Over Banks' Commodities Holdings

Regulators are scrutinizing big banks which control commodities like aluminum and oil. The Federal Reserve is considering restricting their ability to trade and warehouse physical commodities. But Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee suggested the Fed isn't moving fast enough on rules to prevent banks from exploiting their holdings at the expense of the public.

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