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Statement Over 'Three-Fifths' Creates Full Controversy

Weekend Edition guest host Don Gonyea talks to Leslie Harris, associate professor of history at Emory University, about the controversy triggered by Emory President James Wagner's praise for the "three-fifths compromise" of the U.S. Constitution. The notorious measure decreed that slaves were three-fifths of a person.
NPR

Civil Rights Exhibit Highlights Successes, Work Left To Be Done

The exhibit at Emory University in Atlanta lays out the history of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a group first presided over by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The group tackled issues of health care, poverty and gun violence — issues still seen as relevant today.
NPR

Senate Decisions Could Put Lindsey Graham's Seat At Risk

The South Carolina Republican has been outspoken in his criticism of President Obama's administration lately, particularly his opposition to Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense. But this may have to do more with a possible primary challenge than the nomination itself.
NPR

'Nordic Cool' Illuminates D.C.'s Kennedy Center

From the Danish modern furniture of the 1950s to the omnipresence of Ikea, Americans have long been attracted to the austere design of Nordic countries. Now a massive festival in Washington, D.C., showcases artists and designers from the very top sliver of the globe.
NPR

Fighting Stream Of Terrorist Capital, Kenya Cracks Down on Somali Businesses

U.S. counterterrorism efforts include choking off the flow of cash to extremists and urging friendly countries to help. But in places like the Nairobi neighborhood of Eastleigh, where Somali refugees have flocked, it's hard to distinguish between tainted money and honest cash.
NPR

States Take Sides As Court Revisits Voting Rights Act

The last time the Supreme Court heard a challenge to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, only one state asked that its key provision be struck down. But just four years later, seven states say the most effective civil rights statute in the nation's history has outlived its usefulness.
NPR

As Police Drones Take Off, Washington State Pushes Back

Unmanned aerial vehicles are starting to show up in American police departments, courtesy of grants from the Department of Homeland Security. But that's caused something of a backlash, and now some state legislatures are considering legal limits on drones to address opponents' privacy concerns.

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