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Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

Parts of the U.S. and Canada have seen a rapid decline in moose populations that may be linked to climate change. And, scientists and hunters warn, those declines have often been accompanied by a surge of infestations of the winter tick.
NPR

As City Grapples With Murder Rate, Police Chief Reaches Out

Gary, Ind., just experienced its 43rd homicide this year — all while the city is trying to get a handle on long-standing problems within its police department. Internal troubles aside, Gary's police chief has made a point of personally connecting with the families of each murder victim.
NPR

Charlie Trotter, Famous Chicago Chef, Has Died At 54

Famous for his quest to fill three daily tasting menus with innovative dishes, Trotter helped bring a new dimension to fine dining in Chicago and beyond when he opened his restaurant in 1987.
NPR

Wondering If You Need A Strep Test? Crowdsourcing Might Help

A fever, lack of cough, and sick neighbors could help you assess your strep status at home. By measuring how many people have strep in the community, researchers say it could be much easier to figure out when it's time to go for the lab test.
NPR

Police Weren't 'Minutes' Behind Los Angeles Shooting Suspect

More information is coming in about what happened at Los Angeles International Airport and the young man suspected of killing at TSA officer and wounding several other people. Early headlines about warnings concerning Paul Ciancia's mental state and efforts to find him appear to have been wrong.
NPR

Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.
NPR

Ban The Box: Some Companies Stop Asking Job Applicants About Criminal History

Big box retailer Target said it will remove questions about prior arrests on its job applications, but many companies still ask. Host Michel Martin speaks with Madeline Neighly from the National Employment Law Project and Elizabeth Milito from the National Federation of Independent Businesses about the pros and cons of the practice.
NPR

Going On 'The Baby Chase' From Arizona To India

The new book "The Baby Chase" follows an Arizona couple all the way to India and back, in their quest to have a baby. Host Michel Martin is joined by author Leslie Morgan Steiner and Rhonda Wile, a nurse who hired two surrogates in India to have her children.
NPR

9 Elections To Watch

From the Eastern Seaboard to the Pacific Northwest, there's a colorful and compelling roster of political contests on Tuesday. Many of them have national implications, including a gubernatorial contest in New Jersey and a special congressional runoff in Alabama.
NPR

Insurance Cancellations: The Price Of Mending A Broken System?

The cancellations are making some people angry and many anxious. Opponents of the health law feel vindicated. They all cite the conflict between the cancellation notices and President Obama's repeated promise that people who like their existing health coverage could keep it.

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