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Colleges Move To Ban Selfie Taking At Graduation Ceremonies

The University of South Florida told students to think about "the dignity of the ceremony" before attempting a selfie with the university president as she hands them their diplomas.
NPR

Competition Watches As Wal-Mart Debuts Money Transfer Service

Customers will be able to send and receive up to $900 at a time at more than 4,000 U.S. stores. Analysts don't think the other money transfer clients will be hurt because of their loyal customer base.
NPR

Small Businesses Fight Big-Box Stores By Specializing

As online and mega stores take up more of the retail landscape, small mom-and-pop shops are getting more specific. We examine one of the ways small stores are looking to survive and possibly thrive.
NPR

FCC Set To Change Net Neutrality Rules

On Thursday, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules for how broadband providers should treat the Internet traffic flowing through their networks.
NPR

Mine Dust Rules Could Slow Production, Coal Mining Companies Say

The Mine Safety and Health Administration has announced new regulations reducing the amount of coal dust miners can be exposed to in underground and surface mines.
NPR

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
NPR

Bob Dole Returns To Kansas For Gratitude Tour

The 90-year-old former GOP senator says it's an opportunity to meet with friends and thank voters who supported him during his decades-long career in state and national politics.
NPR

FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes

If the agency has its way, it will ban sales to minors and keep e-cigarettes out of vending machines. People also would be warned that the nicotine vapor the devices emit is addictive.
NPR

In Age Of Custom-Tailored Ed Tech, Teachers Shop Off The Rack

Even as investment in education technology grows, teachers say free tools are just as effective as paid ones.
NPR

Why Are We Spiteful, Even Though It Bites Us Back?

Most of us aren't as maleficent as the fairy in "Sleeping Beauty," but we're still apt to spite others, even at risk of harming ourselves. Psychologists are trying to figure out why.

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