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The Movie Emily Spivey Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Comedy writer Emily Spivey could watch the comedy 9 to 5 a million times. "It really showed me that women are just as hysterical and funny as men," she says.
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From 'Oz,' A Less Than Magical Prequel

Director Sam Raimi and star James Franco can't provide enough pizzazz to carry Oz the Great and Powerful aloft. Their effects-heavy prequel to 1939's Wizard of Oz serves up a long-winded answer to a question most probably weren't asking.
NPR

'Bless Me, Ultima' Role A 'Gift From Heaven'

The new film adaptation, Bless Me, Ultima, tells a story of witchcraft and religion during 1940s New Mexico. The film is based on a popular, but controversial novel that was a staple of Chicano lit. Puerto Rican actress Miriam Colon talks with host Michel Martin about playing the role of Ultima.
NPR

The Movie Alex Karpovsky Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actor-writer-director Alex Karpovsky could watch Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch Drunk Love a million times. "I saw it with a friend of mine, and we both absolutely loved it and immediately started quoting it," he says.
NPR

Film Hoists 'Hava Nagila' Up Onto A Chair, In Celebration Of Song And Dance

Director Roberta Grossman talks about her new film, which traces the evolution of the song that everybody knows — but nobody knows much about — from Jewish folk melody to unmistakable party favorite.
NPR

The Movie David Duchovny Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actor David Duchovny could watch Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather a million times. "If I'm flipping around channels, I'll see it's on and I'll say, 'OK, I'll watch it for a scene or two' and then I can never turn it off," he says.
WAMU 88.5

The Sapphires

Inspired by a true story, "The Sapphires" is a lighthearted film about a serious subject: overcoming the legacy of institutional racism in Australia.

NPR

Fairy Tales For Grown-Ups? More Are On The Way

A slew of new fairy tale films is on the way to your nearest cineplex, but the intended audience might not be what you'd think. Bob Mondello explains how these movies, like their audiences, are growing up, taking on adult themes and dealing with the fears of a new generation of young adults.

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