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Hollywood Searches For 'Pot Of Gold' In China

Renee Montagne talks with Kim Masters, editor-at-large at The Hollywood Reporter, about Hollywood's continuing efforts to break into the Chinese film market. It's now the world's second largest. Masters also hosts The Business on member station KCRW.
NPR

Tarantino's Stolen 'Pulp Fiction' Chevy Found After 19 Years

Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino's red convertible used in "Pulp Fiction' was stolen in 1994; officers believe they recovered it this month in the Oakland area.
NPR

'Guilt Trip': Streisand On Songs, Film And Family

Singer, actor, writer, director and producer Barbra Streisand plays a well-meaning if overbearing Jewish mom in The Guilt Trip. The star says her own mother both encouraged her talents and was jealous of them.
NPR

The Bird That Struts Its Stuff

The Greater sage-grouse is a large bird that makes its living in sagebrush habitats across the western U.S. and Canada. Every year at this time, male sage-grouse perform a striking dance routine each morning at dawn. Jason Robinson, upland game coordinator for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, breaks down the dance and describes challenges the birds face in Utah.
NPR

'Reluctant Fundamentalist' Couldn't Be More Timely

Director Mira Nair's film, The Reluctant Fundamentalist, is based on a novel first published six years ago. But in the shocking aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing, the movie arrives amid intense debate on the alienation of immigrants in the U.S.
NPR

Matthew McConaughey, Getting Serious Again

The leading man known for his good looks and lighthearted charm has made a comfortable career for himself in romantic comedies. Lately, however, he has been taking on more serious roles in films such as Bernie, Magic Mike and most recently Jeff Nichols' Mud.
NPR

Tom Cruise's Latest Headed For 'Oblivion'

Joseph Kosinski's sci-fi adventure, starring Tom Cruise, is the most incoherent piece of storytelling since John Travolta's Battlefield Earth. It had critic David Edelstein crying, "What? What?" over the din of the explosions.

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