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NPR

Hollywood's 'Hooray': Hardly A Happy Hymn

It's Oscar season, meaning that classic toe-tapper "Hooray for Hollywood" will soon be booming out of TV speakers everywhere. But the cheery cinema hymn has a more complicated compositional past, as NPR's special correspondent Susan Stamberg explains.
NPR

The Movie Roman Coppola Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Writer-director Roman Coppola could watch Woody Allen's Stardust Memories a million times. "It's a film that is endlessly imaginative and has wonderful surprises at every corner," he says.
NPR

The Scottish Play (The Olivier Way)

British stage and screen legend Laurence Olivier had always hoped to produce his own film version of Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth. Now, decades after Olivier's death, a researcher has stumbled across his lost screen treatment of "the Scottish play."
NPR

Second Chances Find 'Safe Haven' In Sparks' Latest Love Story

Nicholas Sparks is known for writing love stories, many of which have gone on to big-screen success. His latest, Safe Haven, is about a woman escaping her past in a small beach town in North Carolina.
NPR

'Identity Thief': Nearly Two Hours, Stolen

The individual ingredients that make up Identity Thief could add up to a great movie. But the digital-age mistaken-identity comedy wastes a talented leading actress and a passable plot; it's a predictable trudge of a road movie.
NPR

Tyler Perry Transforms: From Madea To Family Man

Best known for being the man behind Madea, Perry recently starred in the action thriller Alex Cross which is now out on DVD. We listen back to an October interview, in which he told Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his Madea character is a cross between his mom, his aunt and Eddie Murphy.
NPR

'Caesar' Comes Alive In An Italian Prison

In Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's new film, Caesar Must Die, a group of prisoners put on Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. It's barely an hour and a quarter, and it's physically small-scale, but it's so compressed it wears you out — in a good way.
NPR

Conn. Congressman Petitions Spielberg To Change State's Voting Record In 'Lincoln'

Steven Spielberg's Lincoln didn't sit quite right with Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney, namely the part of the film that depicts two of his predecessors from Connecticut voting against the constitutional amendment to end slavery. Courtney left the theater, checked the facts and discovered that the movie was in fact wrong: All four Connecticut representatives at the time voted for the amendment. Courtney tells Audie Cornish that he is now asking Spielberg to correct the error before the film goes to DVD.

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