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What About Donald Sterling's Right To Privacy?

The racist comments made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling led to a life-long ban from the NBA. But they were made in what appears to have been a private setting. Should that matter?
WAMU 88.5

The Battle Over Broadcast TV: Aereo at the Supreme Court

A company that makes dime-sized antennas is challenging the business model for watching and streaming TV shows. Tech Tuesday looks at the Supreme Court case with implications for cloud storage and consumers' wallets.

NPR

So Much For Scoops: Newspapers Turn To Data-Crunching And Context

The news business is evolving: There's a new land rush by news organizations seeking not just to break the news, but also to explain it using data-driven analyses.
NPR

American Journalist Freed By Kidnappers In Eastern Ukraine

Simon Ostrovsky, a reporter for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint by masked men in the city of Slovyansk earlier this week. Vice says he is now safe and in good health.
NPR

American Journalist Kidnapped By Ukraine's Pro-Russia Insurgents

The reporter for Vice News was seized by gunmen on Tuesday but is "fine," according to a spokeswoman for his kidnappers.
NPR

There Is A Media Slant, And Readers Might Be Responsible

Professor and economist Matthew Gentzkow, the recent winner of the John Bates Clark Medal, discusses how to predict media slant and use big data in economics.
NPR

Who's Crazy Enough To Start A Newspaper In 2014? Ask LA Register

The Los Angeles Register is a newspaper that just launched this week. Despite dropping newspaper sales, Ben Bergman of KPCC reports that the publisher thinks there's still an audience for print.
NPR

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

"Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.
NPR

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.
NPR

Tremendously Gratifying To Win 2 Pulitzers, 'Post' Editor Says

After years of circulation declines and painful staffing cuts, this year's two Pulitzer Prizes are especially sweet. David Greene talks to Marty Baron, the executive editor for The Washington Post.

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