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TV Prank Reveals News Media Shortcoming

ABC late-night host Jimmy Kimmel's fake twerking video not only made thousand of people believe a woman accidentally set herself on fire by twerking upside down, it fooled loads of news outlets into playing the fraudulent clip as if it were real. In one swoop, Kimmel uncovered how reliant many news programs are on found material they cannot or do not verify.

This Is (Not) The Most Important Story Of The Year

Stories that titillate, amuse or arouse flash-in-the-pan outrage may be more widely read and shared than solid information. Celebrity and scandals have always attracted media attention, but in the Internet age the balance is shifting more toward entertainment.

The Internet Hoaxes That Had Us All Clicking For More

Fake stories on the Internet are not new, but their nature is changing. They seem to be more calculated, more elaborate and have a deeper intent to elicit a swell of emotion. Grantland writer Tess Lynch explains why she thinks 2013 was the year of the hoax — and which story even fooled her.

Will Renewables Suffer Because Of U.S. Oil And Gas Boom

The U.S. may or may not have achieved energy independence in 2013. There is much debate about what that phrase means and when it might (or already did) happen. But the year just passed will definitely be remembered as a time when oil and natural gas markets started changing quickly and perceptions about America's role in world energy markets changed as well.

We Say Goodbye To Some NPR Colleagues

Morning Edition wishes news anchors Jean Cochran and Paul Brown well. A number of our coworkers took the chance to accept voluntary buyouts as NPR changes. Leaving the Morning Edition staff are: Anne Hawke, Jim Wildman and Steve Munro.

'60 Minutes' Criticized For NSA Report

CBS is once again facing criticism over a story aired on 60 Minutes — this one about the National Security Agency. This new controversy over the show's journalism comes on the heels of a false story the show aired on the attacks against the U.S. diplomatic installation in Benghazi, Libya.

In Press-Rights Battle, Reporter Says Accountability's At Risk

The Justice Department is trying to compel New York Times journalist James Risen to testify in the case of a former CIA official who may or may not have leaked classified information to him. The case calls into question the limits of the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of the press.
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Remembering Quizmaster Mac McGarry

For five decades Mac McGarry was a fixture of Saturday morning television in Washington, hosting the teen quiz bowl "It's Academic." McGarry died last week at age 87. We revisit his 2005 interview with Kojo.


Photojournalists Push White House For Better Access To Obama

Reporters gave White House Press Secretary Jay Carney a tough time Thursday over the way in which the administration controls President Obama's image. In this case literally, by severely limiting the situations in which professional photojournalists get to take pictures of the president. News organizations have formally protested.

AP Reporter Tracks Down Bodies In Mali

Steve Inskeep talks with Rukmini Callimachi, who brings a whole new meaning to the term "dogged reporter." Last summer, while in Mali, the West Africa bureau chief for the AP personally found and exhumed six alleged victims of illegal military assassinations and brought out their families to identify them.