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NPR

The Surprising After Effects Of A Notorious 'Wardrobe Malfunction'

Audie Cornish speaks with writer Marin Cogan about the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" incident at the Super Bowl halftime show featuring Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake, which happened a decade ago this month. Marin wrote a piece on the incident that is featured in ESPN the Magazine.
NPR

Detention Of Al-Jazeera Journalists Strains Free Speech In Egypt

Canadian-Egyptian journalist Mohamed Fadel Fahmy has been accused of running a terrorist cell with the help of four foreigners; allegations the news agency calls "baseless and false." The case has shown just how far Egypt has backslid on the goals of an uprising that began three years ago this week.
NPR

China Is Poised To Force 'Times' Reporter Out Of Country

The development comes despite objections from Vice President Joe Biden, who has urged senior officials in Beijing not to punish U.S. journalists with de facto expulsion. China has not granted a request for a new visa that was made last summer.
NPR

Former Wonkblog Team To Create New Site For Vox Media

Ezra Klein and the team behind the Wonkblog at The Washington Post have found a new home. They are joining Vox Media, a digital outfit with sites serving sports fans, foodies and gamers — but little in the way of news about politics. The creation of the new site, tentatively called Project X, demonstrates the pull of digital media for entrepreneurial journalists.
NPR

The Tonight Show And The Business Of Late Night

After hosting The Tonight Show for two decades, Jay Leno will pass the torch to Jimmy Fallon in February. NPR's Kelly McEvers tals with Matt Belloni, executive editor for The Hollywood Reporter, about the business of late-night talk shows.
WAMU 88.5

Russian Activist Masha Gessen And The Art Of Dissent

The Russian-American journalist joins Kojo to discuss the rise of anti-gay laws in Russia, the upcoming Sochi Olympics and the art of dissent.

NPR

In Grantland Backlash, Both Ire And Probing Questions

Controversy has dogged an article published last week on the website Grantland. The piece is called "Dr. V's Magical Putter," and it tells the unusual tale of Essay Anne Vanderbilt, who designed a golf putter that attracted positive attention. In the course of reporting the article, writer Caleb Hannon discovered that several purported facts about Vanderbilt's life had been falsified. Hannon also learned that Vanderbilt had been born a man and was living life as a woman. Critics of Hannon's article have alleged, among other things, that his reporting contributed to Vanderbilt's suicide in October 2013.
NPR

Biography Argues Roger Ailes Uses Fox To Divide Nation

Roger Ailes is a hero to the political right and a boogeyman to the left for leading the Fox News Channel to become the top-rated force in cable news --- the competition is not even close. Ailes and Fox refused to cooperate with author Gabriel Sherman.
NPR

Digital World Puts Olympic Coverage Through Its Paces

NBCUniversal has made a deal with Facebook to provide more than 1,000 hours of digital coverage of the upcoming Winter Olympic games.
NPR

Clear, Sharp And Properly Exposed: How A Photo Made A Career

Photographer Bill O'Leary's big break came in 1990, the night Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry was arrested during an FBI sting. O'Leary was an intern for The Washington Post, and he suddenly found himself in the right place and the right time to take the perfect shot of the mayor.

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