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After Investigation, No Evidence 'Wall Street Journal' Bribed Chinese Officials

The Wall Street Journal's China bureau was the subject of a Department of Justice inquiry into allegations that the bureau had been bribing Chinese officials in exchange for information. Investigation by the parent company turned up no evidence to uphold the claim.
NPR

As Consumers Jump Ship, News Outlets Shift Priorities

Americans are abandoning their long-trusted news outlets in high numbers. According to a Pew Research Center report, 31 percent of Americans say they have deserted a particular news outlet because it no longer provides the information they want.
NPR

Seniors Flirt With AARP's Online Dating Service

Here's the plan: Find someone, get married, grow old together. But what if you've done that, and suddenly find yourself back at square one? For those 50 and older, AARP has launched a dating site to help find that special someone.
NPR

From Tweeting To Meeting Lance Armstrong

Sports Illustrated writer Michael McCann had been covering Lance Armstrong's legal issues for the past year when he noticed a new follower on Twitter. It was the disgraced cyclist himself, and he invited McCann over for an exclusive interview.
NPR

'Keep Google Reader Running' Petition Hits 100K; Fans Audition Replacements

Google's announcement this week that it will kill its Reader product on July 1 prompted moans of despair from those who rely on the free RSS service to monitor headlines. To illustrate the level of dependency they've come to feel, some are comparing the move to Google abandoning search.
NPR

Cultivating Sources Can Be A Minefield For Women Reporters

Audie Cornish talks to reporters Marin Cogan and Karin Tanabe about the pop-culture stereotype of the female political reporter who trades sex for access. The Netflix show House of Cards inspired Cogan to write an article in The New Republic, condemning the trope. She says female reporters are actually much more likely to be sexually harassed by the men they cover than to try to seduce them. Her former colleague Tanabe agrees — but her new novel nonetheless has an affair between a reporter and a senator as a central storyline.

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