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WAMU 88.5

Aftershocks Of The Edward Snowden Case

Kojo chats with one of the activists who recently met face-to-face with Edward Snowden in Russia.

WAMU 88.5

Photographer Documents D.C.'s Haunting Memorials To Street Violence

Photographer Lloyd Wolf travels to murder sites across the District to document street memorials set up to honor murder victims.

WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: Haunted D.C.

We'll gear up for some ghost hunting as we bring you our annual celebration of the region's creepiest and spookiest.

NPR

Headlines From Around The World

The stories are from a cross-section of news organizations around the world. Thursday's headlines range from more fallout over the NSA's surveillance of U.S. allies to Canadian interest rates.
NPR

eBay Founder Explains His Venture Into Journalism

Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, is the latest tech giant to make a bold bet on the future of journalism. Renee Montagne talks with the entrepreneur-philanthropist about his $250 million media venture.
NPR

AP Firings Leave Many In News Media Scratching Their Heads

A brief Associated Press story that wrongly claimed Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe had been accused in court documents of lying to a federal investigator has resulted in the firings of several AP journalists.
NPR

Chinese Paper Makes Unprecedented Plea For Reporter's Release

An investigative journalist at Guangzhou's New Express was taken away by police after reporting on financial irregularities at a local firm. A front-page commentary called for authorities to free him.
WAMU 88.5

Doris Kearns Goodwin: "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, And The Golden Age Of Journalism"

The nation's 26th president was both a leader of the Republican Party and a Progressive. How Theodore Roosevelt used his "bully pulpit" -- a term he coined -- to push through laws to break up monopolies, protect consumers and create national parks.

WAMU 88.5

'War Of The Worlds,' 75 Years Later

It was 75 years ago that Orson Welles produced one of the most famous broadcasts in radio history: "War of the Worlds." But much of the mythology now associated with the original broadcast -- stories of miscarriages and suicides -- may be as fictional as the play's alien invasion storyline. Radio historian Neil Verma joins Kojo to explore what really happened, as well as the craft behind the radio play itself

NPR

Headlines From Around The World

The stories are from a cross section of news organizations around the world. Wednesday's stories range from a border defense agreement between India and China to curtailed mail delivery in New Zealand.

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