Media

RSS Feed
NPR

'Truth Goggles' Double-Checks What Politicians Say

As the presidential candidates grip and grin their way across the early primary states, many voters are tuning in online to get the latest information on their policies and plans. But sifting through the muck of rumor, fact and fiction online isn't easy, so MIT grad student Dan Schultz came up with an idea to help: "Truth Goggles." He shares his creation with host Audie Cornish.
NPR

The News Tip: Beyond A Strong Brand

As more journalists are building up their personal brands, NPR's David Folkenflik cautions that the brand is only part of the equation. While having a star journalist can help a media organization, it can also create tension.
NPR

'When Did Liberals Become So Unreasonable?'

This week in New York Magazine, two writers from different political parties each critiqued their own side. On Thursday, we heard from conservative David Frum, who argues Republicans lost touch with reality. In the same issue, liberal writer Jonathan Chait also uses the word "fantasy" in describing liberals. He tells Steve Inskeep liberals have become unreasonable.
NPR

Racist History Of American News Media?

The new book News for All the People traces how mainstream publishers and broadcasters perpetuated racism through their coverage, but also how journalists of color fought to develop a more democratic, alternative press. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with the authors about their work and where the internet stands in diversifying news.
NPR

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: The Columnist's Voice

Daily Beast and Newsweek editor Tina Brown explores the work of newspaper columnists through readings that propose a new way of looking at the 2012 election and the scandal at Penn State.
NPR

Online Ads: Spreading Your Message, On A Budget

Most of the videos in the presidential campaign so far have been seen, and distributed, online. They're cheaper for the candidates to produce, and often get picked up by news outlets anyway.
NPR

Coverage Of OWS Protests Puts Site In Tough Spot

One company is benefiting from the Occupy Wall Street movement: Livestream.com. The site has attracted 11 million unique viewers to the 80 or so Occupy-themed channels set up by organizers to broadcast raw footage of protests from around the world. But it made for an uncomfortable fit between advertisers and the Occupy audience.

Pages