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NPR

Volunteers Rally To Save War Columnist's Museum

A museum dedicated to Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II columnist Ernie Pyle is in danger of closing. The site, in Pyle's hometown of Dana, Ind., attracts fewer than 2,000 visitors annually. The state recently cut off support to the museum and moved a number of the artifacts to the capitol. Now, a group of community volunteers is rallying to try to preserve the museum and Pyle's legacy.
WAMU 88.5

GovExec: Ranking Federal Agencies' Tweets

A new report is looking at how well federal agencies are using Twitter to interact with the public.  

NPR

Adbusters Co-Founder Discusses OWS

Robert Siegel talks to Kalle Lasn, a co-founder of Adbusters Magazine. Lasn helped originate the idea for the Occupy Wall Street movement.
NPR

'Times' Advice Guru Answers Your Social Q's

New York Times advice columnist Philip Galanes details how to handle breakups, cellphone calls and food allergies — among other topics — in his book Social Q's: How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries and Quagmires of Today.
NPR

Whether 'Burma' Or 'Myanmar,' The Root Is The Same

Melissa Block and Guy Raz note that not all news outlets have accepted the name Myanmar for the country also known as Burma. They describe the issue of accepting a name chosen by a brutal regime — and how, in the end, it doesn't matter because the root word is the same.
NPR

NPR CEO Gary Knell's First Day At Work

Thursday, public television veteran Gary Knell takes the helm at NPR, becoming president and CEO after more than 20 years with PBS. Knell assumes the post after a period of turmoil at NPR. He joins NPR's Neal Conan to share his plans for leading the company.
NPR

New NPR CEO Gary Knell Starts Work, Takes Listeners' Calls

He fills the positions that opened earlier this year when controversies led to Vivian Schiller's departure. Today on Talk of the Nation, and later on Twitter, Knell takes questions.
NPR

British Panel Told Phone-Hacking Was Necessary

The wide-ranging inquiry into criminal abuses by the British press has led to testimony about relationships and careers damaged by tabloid excess. Newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. are at the heart of the scandal. A former features editor for one of those papers stole the show at Tuesday's hearing.

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