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NPR

Do Zimbabweans See Election As A Sham?

Zimbabwe's longtime president Robert Mugabe held on to power, despite a challenging election. But his opponent, Morgan Tsvangirai, called the results a farce and plans to fight them. Host Michel Martin talks to independent journalist Frank Chikowore about how Zimbabweans view the election results.
NPR

Brother Wants Parents To Stop Siblings' Homeschooling

College student Josh Powell says he had huge gaps in his education from being homeschooled. Now, he's advocating for his siblings to attend public school, despite a religious exception given to his family. Host Michel Martin talks to Powell about his experience.
NPR

Will A Hockey Arena Save Detroit?

Despite filing for bankruptcy, Detroit is still on track to get a $450 million hockey arena - partially funded with public money. Host Michel Martin speaks with sportswriter Dave Zirin, who calls the move 'shameless,' and David Muller, a business reporter for the MLive Media Group in Michigan.
NPR

Pope Francis' Comments: 'A Bridge, Not A Barrier'?

Pope Francis made headlines with his recent comments about gay priests. But many Catholics thought what he said about politics, poverty and women during his Brazil trip were just as ground-breaking. Host Michel Martin gets perspective from Father Leo Patalinghug and Professor Anthea Butler.
NPR

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

New statistics show the number of prisoners in the United States continues to fall. So what's behind the new trend, and is it here to stay? Host Michel Martin speaks with Vikrant Reddy from Right on Crime, and Nicole Porter from The Sentencing Project.
NPR

After 3 Decades Of Mugabe, Could Zimbabwe Get A New Leader?

Zimbabwe is gearing up for elections this week, and 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to continue his grip on power. NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is in Harare for the vote. She joins host Michel Martin to talk more about what's at stake.
NPR

Fresh Air Remembers Former Louisiana Congresswoman Lindy Boggs

Boggs moved to Washington in 1941, when her husband was elected to Congress. After his plane disappeared on a campaign trip through Alaska, she ran for his seat and won, becoming the first woman elected to Congress from her state.
NPR

John Gallagher Jr. On 'Newsroom' Dialogue And Staging Green Day

In addition to playing a cable news producer on Aaron Sorkin's HBO drama, Gallagher is a Tony Award-winning Broadway performer. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about starring in a punk rock musical and rehearsing Sorkin's Newsroom scripts.
NPR

Fresh Air Weekend: Maria Bamford, 'Lunches With Orson' And '& Sons'

The comedienne's routines tackle some of the really serious problems she has. Transcripts of filmmaker Henry Jaglom's conversations with Orson Welles have been released in a new book. David Gilbert tells the story of an aging writer whose children do not feel as warmly toward him as his readers do.
NPR

What's It Take To Be A Polar Explorer?

From the TED Radio Hour, polar explorer Ben Saunders on what pushes adventurers like him to brink of human endurance. In 2004, Saunders became the third man — and the most recent — to ski solo to the North Pole.

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