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'Terrorists In Love': The Psychology Of Extremism

What motivates someone to become a terrorist? That's the question former prosecutor Ken Ballen set out to tackle when he traveled to Saudi Arabia and Indonesia to interview more than 100 Islamist extremists. "We've never sat back and said, 'Let's really understand our adversaries,' " he says.
NPR

How The Financial Crisis Created A 'New Third World'

In Boomerang, writer Michael Lewis tells the stories of the countries hit hardest by the 2008 financial crisis. He also profiles some people who bet against European governments and are likely to make millions if and when they default.
NPR

A Leading Figure In The New Apostolic Reformation

Several apostles affiliated with the movement helped organize or spoke at Rick Perry's recent prayer rally. A leading apostle, C. Peter Wagner, talks about the movement and its missions, which include acquiring leadership positions in government, the media, and arts and entertainment.
NPR

In 'Boomerang,' Cheap Credit Exposes Nations' Flaws

No two countries are experiencing the global financial crisis in the same way. And author Michael Lewis says you can tell a lot about each country by looking at its problems. To research for his new book, Boomerang, Lewis visited some of the most financially challenged countries in the world.
NPR

NPR Turns To Public Television For New Leader

Gary Knell will take over as CEO and president after a rocky year in which the network lost several top executives and faced renewed funding challenges. He currently leads the company behind Sesame Street and other beloved children's shows.
NPR

TV's Fixation With 'The New Breed' Of '60s Women

This fall, television is continuing its love affair with the 1960s. ABC's Pan Am and NBC's The Playboy Club put the women of the era front and center. Part of the trend is due to the hit show Mad Men, but viewers might also be fascinated with how far we've come with gender equality.
NPR

When Scientists Fail, It's Time To Call In The Gamers

For more than a decade, Researchers were stumped by the structure of a tiny protein that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys. Eventually they turned to computer gamers, who figured out the protein's structure in just 10 days.
NPR

Want Good TV? Try These Three Shows

TV critic David Bianculli says most shows on TV this fall are a big disappointment. But three offerings this upcoming Sunday night — Prohibition, Dexter and Homeland — are all excellent, invigorating and exceptionally intelligent.
NPR

Franzen Tackles Suburban Parenting In 'Freedom'

Jonathan Franzen's novel Freedom was called "a masterpiece" by Time Magazine and received rave reviews from critics. Franzen talks about the runaway success of his previous novel The Corrections, and the strong reaction elicited by Freedom.
NPR

Mitch Daniels: Avoid 'Fiscal Niagara' On Social Security

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels urges adjusting the Social Security system in his new book, Keeping the Republic. In the book, Daniels writes that Carlo Ponzi — the con man whose name became synonymous with a swindling scheme — would make "an ideal Social Security commissioner."

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