International

RSS Feed
NPR

Teju Cole Writes A Story A Tweet At A Time

Nigerian-American writer Teju Cole has always used Twitter in creative ways. He recently asked a few dozen followers to tweet one line each, which he turned into a short story. Cole tells host Michel Martin more about the project.
NPR

Paul Lo, From Hmong Refugee To California Judge

Paul Lo spent part of his childhood in a refugee camp in Thailand. Now he has been appointed as a judge on the Merced County Superior Court in California. That reportedly makes him the first Hmong-American judge in U.S. history. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lo about his unusual path to the bench.
NPR

Egyptian Voters Said To Overwhelmingly Back New Constitution

Unofficial results say more than 95 percent of voters approved the document. The results are seen as a boost to the military government and Army chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who is widely expected to seek Egypt's presidency. The Muslim Brotherhood boycotted this week's vote.
NPR

Photos May Show Marines Burning Iraqis' Bodies

The Marine Corps is looking into images obtained by the entertainment website TMZ. They appear to show U.S. Marines burning the corpses of Iraqi fighters during the 2004 battles in Fallujah.
NPR

Vatican Comes Under U.N. Scrutiny Over Priest Abuse Scandal

The Committee on the Rights of the Child takes church officials to task for their handling of sex abuse allegations, saying the Holy See must "take all appropriate measures" to keep children safe.
NPR

Do You Know Who Owns Your Favorite Liquor?

Many spirits are tied to a particular place, but liquor companies have gone global and a small number of firms now dominate the market internationally.
NPR

Battlefield In Northern Syria Evolves As Rebels Fight Rebels

Al-Qaida-linked militants from the group known as ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, were on the run, pushed out of many of their strongholds by an alliance of rebels opposed to al-Qaida. But now, ISIS has regained control of the only provincial capital held by the rebels.
NPR

2004 Tsunami Leaves Many Worse Off Than Before

Just after Christmas, the Indian Ocean tsunami killed nearly a quarter of a million people. Among the worst hit areas was the Indonesian province of Aceh, where more than 175,000 people died. Have the victims been able to rebuild their lives over the last nine years?
NPR

Militias In Mexican State Keep Up Fight Against Cartel

Mexican forces are moving into the country's western state of Michoacan. The huge federal force is trying to disarm a growing number of civilian militias, which have been fighting against a ruthless drug cartel that controls much of the state.
NPR

Reports Of Arrests And Torture Under Nigeria's Anti-Gay Law

Under a shroud of secrecy, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan signed the Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act on Jan. 7. In Nigeria, the law has become known by many as the "Jail the Gays" law. Melissa Block speaks with Michelle Faul, the Associated Press Chief Africa Correspondent, about the law's ramifications.

Pages