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Why One Expert Says Edward Snowden Deserves Clemency

As the courts decide whether the NSA practices revealed by the former contractor are constitutional, the court of public opinion considers what should become of him. David Greene talks to Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, about why she believes Snowden's actions were commendable.
NPR

Despite Warning Signs, South Sudan's Violence Escalated Fast

The United States played a key role in helping South Sudan gain independence. But, U.S. diplomats are having a hard time helping the country emerge from internal political and ethnic violence.
NPR

Even In Snowden-Friendly Brazil, Asylum May Be 'Bridge Too Far'

Should they or shouldn't they? That's the question Brazilians are asking themselves after Edward Snowden's "open letter" lauding Brazil's role in protecting privacy rights and alluding to his hand in uncovering spying against their president.
NPR

The Pentagon Weighs Its Options In Syria And Iraq

Violence is spreading now in both Syria and Iraq, with al-Qaida and other jihadi fighters increasing their influence. In Syria, the U.S. is putting its hopes on peace talks, but there is no sign that the U.S. will go beyond that. The Pentagon has drawn up plans to increase the rebel training effort now being done by the CIA, but the White House has not given the go-ahead. In Iraq, the U.S. has said it will not send troops. Instead, it will sell missiles and drones to help the Iraqi government beat back a resurgent al-Qaida in Ramadi and Fallujah. The bottom line: The U.S. doesn't want to get dragged into either country.
NPR

Fallujah Veterans Ask Hard Questions About Their Sacrifices

A radical group with links to al-Qaida has taken intermittent control of key parts of Fallujah in western Iraq. It's the same area where U.S. troops saw some of their bloodiest fights during the Iraq war a decade ago, costing the U.S. more lives than in any other region in Iraq.
NPR

How Al-Qaida Returned To A Troubled Part Of Iraq

Western Iraq was one of the most chaotic parts of the country during the U.S. war there. Al-Qaida extremists were defeated once, but with U.S. forces gone, they've managed to return as Iraq continues to slide into chaos.
NPR

U.N. Suspends Counting Deaths In Syria's Civil War

The U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights says it can't verify its sources and so will leave the figure at 100,000, where it stood in July.
NPR

Run Run Shaw, Kung Fu Movie Pioneer, Dies

The Hong Kong movie mogul's films included 1972's Five Fingers of Death, which was a kung fu classic. With his brother Ronnie, Shaw produced more than 1,000 films over five decades. He also helped produce some American films, including Blade Runner. Later, he became a prominent philanthropist.
NPR

Dennis Rodman Defends North Korean 'Basketball Diplomacy'

In a combative interview with CNN, the former NBA star implies that imprisoned American businessman Kenneth Bae, sentenced in May to 15 years' hard labor, is guilty of trying to overthrow the regime of Kim Jong Un.
NPR

London's Cheeky Skyscrapers

London's most modern skyscrapers have their formal names. But they are also given irreverent nicknames like "The Cheese Grater" and "The Prawn."

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