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After Boston Bombing, A New Focus On Chechnya

The two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing were ethnically Chechen. The central Asian region of Chechnya has a troubled history. It has also seen some of that region's most notorious terrorist incidents in recent memory. Host Michel Martin learns more from Alexey Malashenko of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
NPR

Rescuers Struggling To Reach Areas Of China Hit By Quake

More than 180 people are reported to have been killed by Saturday's strong temblor. Aftershocks and landslides are making difficult to get to the villages and other places in Sichuan province that were hit hard.
NPR

How Coffee Brings The World Together

Coffee is social stimulant, solitary pleasure, intellectual catalyst. It also connects us to far corners of the globe. From small specialty farms in Guatemala to large, industrial operations in Brazil and unexpected corners of the world, like Vietnam, the world's morning cup of joe makes quite a journey.
NPR

Want More Gender Equality At Work? Go To An Emerging Market

In the U.S., 3 percent of the CEOs at top companies are women; in India, that figure is 14 percent. Economist Sylvia Ann Hewlett says women in India and other emerging economies, like China and Brazil, are surpassing their American and European counterparts. They're "pointing the way," she says.
NPR

Battling Obstacles, Chinese Relief Crews Seek Quake Victims

Landslides and congested roadways are hindering rescuers' progress as they make their way to rural communities in Sichuan Province. The earthquake Saturday, which killed at least 186, is a test of the new leadership's response to natural disaster.
NPR

Rare Churchill Poem Fails To Sell At Auction

When the only known poem Winston Churchill wrote as an adult went up for auction in London recently, it was expected to fetch a pretty penny. But the poem failed to fetch a buyer, and now its fate is unknown. New Yorker Poetry Editor Paul Muldoon takes a critical look at "Our Modern Watchwords."

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