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Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Potential U.S. military action in Syria has raised some big questions about the duty of the United States to intervene in other countries' affairs — as well as how the U.S. goes about such action. For some perspective, Steve Inskeep talks with novelist and Yale law professor Stephen L. Carter.
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How Concerns For Israel's Security Enters Into Sryria Plan

Renee Montagne talks to analyst David Makovsky of The Washington Institute for Near East Policy about the degree to which concern for Israel is shaping the Obama administration's thinking on Syria.
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French Parliament To Debate U.S.-Led Strikes In Syria

French lawmakers on Wednesday will debate how to respond to an alleged chemical attack in Syria. France made public intelligence documents suggesting the Syrian government was behind the attack. At the same time, the French newspaper, Le Figaro, published an interview with Syrian President Bashar Assad.
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British Airways Adds Nonstop Flight To Austin

Starting in March, British Airways says it will begin nonstop service between London and Austin, Texas. The move comes as something of a surprise, given that the airline already serves Dallas and Houston.
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What If Congress Votes 'No' On Syria?

If Congress fails to authorize a U.S. military strike against Syria, it could weaken President Obama internationally and domestically. But it could also give Obama the political cover to back away from his "red line" proclamation against the Syrian government for its alleged use of sarin gas.
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5 Years After Being Covered With Water, Chinese Village Emerges

A powerful earthquake completely flooded their village in 2008 — but thanks to a steep drop in the water level, former residents of Xuanping are returning to look at homes, businesses, and their old school.
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A Look Back At A Predicted 'Clash Of Civilizations'

It was 20 years ago that Samuel Huntington's essay on what he termed "the clash of civilizations" was first published in the journal Foreign Affairs. The essay predicted the next frontier of global conflict would occur along cultural cleavages — most prominently between the Islamic world and the West. Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose and Robert Siegel discuss how perceptions of the essay have changed over time.
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Outrage Over Alleged NSA Spying Spreads To Mexico

Mexicans are outraged over allegations that the National Security Agency was spying on President Enrique Pena Nieto even before he was elected Mexico's leader. The charges were broadcast over the weekend in Brazil and claimed the NSA spied on Brazil's leader, Dilma Rousseff, as well.
NPR

China's Leadership Faces Test In Fixing Justice System

Reports of judicial corruption and miscarriages of justice in China have attracted a lot of attention and criticism from ordinary Chinese. China's new leaders, worried this is eroding their credibility, have pledged to correct every botched court case that they find. One such case is putting the leadership's rhetoric to the test.
NPR

The Beauty Of Bricks In Burkina Faso

Photographer David Pace says there's not much for tourists in Burkina Faso. And that's what keeps him going back.

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