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Univision Race Gaffe Shows Culture Gap

A Univision commentator's racist remarks about Michelle Obama reveal an ugly truth about Latin American culture: It's really racist.
NPR

Portugal Beckons With Back Alleys And Boarded-Up Businesses

Forget cathedrals and wine houses. A new guided tour takes visitors to Portugal's slums to see the effects of Europe's economic crisis. This story originally aired March 10 on Morning Edition.
NPR

Isaac Herzog Is Netanyahu's Surprise Challenger In Israel

Isaac Herzog doesn't have the macho profile of recent Israeli prime ministers. But Ari Shavit of Haaretz tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he's emerging as a frontrunner to unseat Benjamin Netanyahu.
NPR

When There's Art On The Bus, You'll Get To Your Stop Sooner

A decade ago Kenya banned the practice of covering minibuses — called matatus — with wild images. The concern: window blockage. Now the art is making a comeback, and powerful bus owners are behind it.
NPR

In Iraq, The Final Battle For Tikrit Is Likely To Be The Hardest

The offensive against ISIS in Tikrit is being eyed by Iraq's various factions — including some the U.S. hopes will help take on ISIS elsewhere. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Deborah Amos in Iraq.
NPR

Walking The Longest River In The World

Levison Wood is an adventurer and explorer who recently walked the length of the river Nile. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Wood about his challenging — and also tragic — journey.
NPR

Netanyahu Maintains Focus On Iran As His Voter Support Falls

Israel's parliamentary election is Tuesday, and so far, the race is too close to call. It's turned into a referendum on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NPR

From Afghanistan's Rubble, A Teacher Builds A School Of Ideas

Amid the obstructionism and violence of Afghanistan, Aziz Royesh has set up a school in Kabul that has won worldwide acclaim.
NPR

How Far Has The Health Of Moms Come Since 1995?

The rate of women worldwide who die in childbirth has dropped by more than 40 percent over the past two decades. But does this rosy global health statistic overstate the extent of change?
NPR

The Fate Of The World's Chocolate Depends On This Spot In Rural England

Cocoa is unusually susceptible to disease. Every year, a third of the crop is destroyed, even as the appetite for chocolate grows. That's why the world needs the International Cocoa Quarantine Centre.

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