International

RSS Feed
NPR

Coal May Pass Oil As World's No. 1 Energy Source By 2017, Study Says

Coal is poised to replace oil as the world's top energy source — possibly in the next five years, according to the International Energy Agency. The rise will be driven largely by growth in China and India, the IEA says, while the only large decline is seen coming in the United States.
NPR

Political And Military Pressure Tightens On Damascus

As the conflict in Syria continues, the international community is preparing for the possible fall of President Bashar Assad's regime. Last week, President Barack Obama formally recognized a Syrian opposition group as the country's legitimate representative.
NPR

Latest Syrian Fighting Touches Off A New Exodus

Most every new round of fighting creates a new wave of displaced people in Syria. A weekend attack near the capital has sent many Palestinian refugees fleeing.
NPR

A View From The Ground: Thailand Confronts Drug-Resistant Malaria

Global deaths from malaria have dropped sharply in the past decade, thanks in part to powerful drugs called artemisinins. But on the border between Thailand and Myanmar, doctors are starting to see cracks in artemisinin's armor. The medicine is working more slowly, and sometimes not at all.
NPR

In France, Free Birth Control For Girls At Age 15

Starting in January, the French government will provide contraceptives for girls ages 15 to 18 — without charge and without parental notification. The measure, which passed parliament without debate, aims to reduce teen pregnancies by increasing access to birth control and education.
NPR

For Two Cubans In Guantanamo, Daily Commute Between Two Worlds Ends

For more than 50 years, the men traveled from their homes in the communist nation to jobs on the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay. "Sometimes you feel like you are living in two worlds," says one. The men just retired.
NPR

U.S. Nervous About Japan's New Prime Minister

The Obama administration will soon be dealing with new leadership in Japan. Over the weekend, Japanese voters returned a former prime minister to the country's top job. Shinzo Abe took an assertive stand on several issues during the election, sparking concern in the U.S. his win could stir up tension in the region.

Pages