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NPR

Saudi Women Get Behind Wheel For 'Drive-In' Protest

"I went to the grocery store," one Saudi woman who drove Saturday says. Her act defies a ban on Saudi female drivers; women took to the streets Saturday as part of a push to allow women to get driver's licenses.
NPR

How A Portland Cook Became A 'Proud Copycat' Of Thai Food

Andy Ricker spent years eating in roadside restaurants, noodle stands and home kitchens across Thailand before opening his first restaurant, Pok Pok, in Portland, Ore. But he avoids using words like "traditional" and "authentic" when talking about this food. He'd rather call it "accurate."
NPR

A Quiet U.S.-Saudi Spat Spills Into The Open

In an unusual display of anger at the U.S., Saudi Arabian officials have sharply criticized the Obama administration's policies in the Middle East, saying Washington has not done enough to support Syria's rebels or bring about peace between Israel and the Palestinians. Host Scott Simon speaks to NPR's Deborah Amos.
NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

We usually associate fish sauce with Southeast Asian cooking. But it turns out the briny condiment also has deep roots in Europe, dating back to the Roman Empire. What caused its decline? Historians say it boils down to taxes, and pirates.
NPR

'Little Maria' A Symbol Of The Many Missing Kids In Europe

The estimated 250,000 children that go missing each year range from teenage runaways escaping abuse at home to kids who have fled war-torn countries such as Afghanistan.
NPR

In Afghanistan, An Uncertain Role For U.S. After 2014

The United States is little more than a year away from ending its combat mission in Afghanistan, yet much is still uncertain about the U.S. role in that country. Next month, Afghan tribal leaders plan a vote that could define the non-combat missions of U.S. troops beyond the year 2014. Meantime, there are questions about the course of the war once U.S. troop levels drop.
NPR

Poverty Toppled Two Egyptian Governments And Still Persists

In the almost three years since Egyptians rose up against autocratic rule there has been one constant: lots of people are still mired in poverty and they're getting poorer. Economic social justice was a main demand of protesters in 2011 and then again in 2013 when protesters took to the streets against Mohamed Morsi. And if Egypt's new leaders don't fix the problem they may face the same problem.
NPR

Will Spying Tank U.S.-Europe Relationship?

Another day, another round of controversy about the NSA surveillance of foreign leaders. Will the White House have a response to the outrage voiced by Europeans and others?
WAMU 88.5

Aftershocks Of The Edward Snowden Case

Kojo chats with one of the activists who recently met face-to-face with Edward Snowden in Russia.

NPR

Little 'Libraires' That Could: French Law Would Keep Amazon At Bay

A proposed law in France prevents online booksellers like Amazon from pricing books at deep discounts. It's the French government's latest effort to protect the country's many independent bookshops.

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