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In Storm-Ravaged Philippines, Corruption Undermines Infrastructure

Some of the destruction from Typhoon Haiyan was not purely the result of the storm's huge force. Among the leading Asian economies, the Philippines regularly ranks as the most corrupt. Robert Siegel talks with Steven Rood, who runs the Asia Foundation's office in Manila, about how the nation's infrastructure problems, laid bare by the storm, relate to graft and corruption.
NPR

Kerry's New Mission: Convince Congress To Take Iran Deal

Secretary of State John Kerry is back in Washington to defend the proposed nuclear deal with Iran to skeptical members of Congress. He and his colleagues from other major powers failed to reach a deal with Iran during talks over the weekend in Geneva. Iran blames France's hard line for blowing up the deal, though Kerry has tried to downplay that.
NPR

Ukraine, A Chocolate Factory And The Fate Of A Woman

Like many former Soviet republics, Ukraine is considering saying goodbye to its Soviet past and signing an economic alignment with the European Union. But with the clock ticking on a free trade agreement, Ukraine is facing hardball tactics from Moscow and a demand from the EU to free its former prime minister.
NPR

Chinese Communist Party Meeting Promises Big, Yet Vague, Changes

China's Communist Party wrapped up a four-day meeting Tuesday that could herald big changes for the nation's economy. The meeting carries the soporific title The Third Plenary of the 18th Central Committee. But historically, a third plenary has meant transformational reforms.
NPR

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

Robert Siegel talks to Richard Brennan, World Health Organization director of emergency risk management and humanitarian response, about the geographic challenges of sending humanitarian aid to Typhoon Haiyan victims.
NPR

At Tacloban Airport, Aid Workers Arrive As Residents Try To Leave

The town of Tacloban on the island of Leyte in the Philippines was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. The scene at the airport there was chaotic as the Philippine and U.S. military delivered food and aid workers and residents rushed to board planes headed back to less-damaged Manila .
NPR

World Anti-Doping Leader: Armstrong Needs 'Miracle' To Return

The cyclist who was stripped of his Tour de France titles after years of cheating were uncovered says he would testify with "100 percent transparency and honesty" if he is treated fairly, the BBC reported Monday.
NPR

Nigerian Pirates Free Kidnapped U.S. Mariners

The captain and engineer from the U.S.-flagged C-Retriever, a 222-foot offshore resupply, were abducted on Oct. 23 when gunman boarded the vessel.
NPR

China's Leaders Unveil Economic Reforms

At the end of the four-day Third Plenum meeting, Communist Party leaders said that state ownership would continue to play a key role in the economy, but endorsed more private ownership.
NPR

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

American entrepreneurs in Kenya are attempting to fundamentally transform education for some of the poorest kids in the world — while making a profit. Classes are large, and lessons are standardized. Some education leaders worry that private, for-profit schools undermine struggling public education systems.

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