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Puerto Rico Defaults On $422 Million Debt Payment

Puerto Rico's governor has issued a debt moratorium on a $422 million payment that the U.S. territory was supposed to pay off on Monday.
NPR

Protesters Rush Parliament Inside Baghdad's Green Zone

NPR's Audie Cornish interviews Loveday Morris, Baghdad bureau chief at the Washington Post, about Muqtada al-Sadr's supporters flooding the city's green zone and the Shiite cleric's return.
NPR

Starbucks And Steel: The Divergent Directions Of China's Economy

China is now home to two economies — one fading and industrial, and the other, a more thriving service sector. A steelworker, a Starbucks executive and a former banker explain.
NPR

The Man At The Center Of Iraq's Political Storm

In the years after the 2003 U.S. invasion, the radical cleric Muqtada al-Sadr emerged as a powerful anti-government force. Now he's reinvented himself. What role will he play in Iraq's future?
NPR

CIA 'Live Tweets' Bin Laden Raid On 5th Anniversary

Osama bin Laden was killed in May 2011. The Internet isn't sure that reconstructing the raid through tweets was the best idea. However you remember that day, here are some things to keep in mind.
NPR

Australian Man Says He Is Bitcoin's Founder

Australian entrepreneur Craig Steven Wright has come forward as the elusive founder of bitcoin, a fact that has been in question for years. Rachel Martin talks to Ludwig Siegele of The Economist.
NPR

2016 Boring Conference In London Sells Out

This is the sixth year for the conference that centers on mundane things. A speech about elevators once got a standing ovation, but the boring buffet was definitely not a crowd pleaser.
NPR

Protesters Pull Back From Baghdad's Green Zone After Rushing Parliament

Over the weekend, protesters broke through the walls surrounding the Green Zone. Rachel Martin talks to James Jeffrey, ex-U.S. ambassador to Iraq, about what the storming of Parliament means.
NPR

Checking In With Paul Salopek, Who's Walking Around The World

Steve Inskeep talks to Paul Salopek, the National Geographic writer who is on a seven-year journey around the globe, tracing the steps of human migration. We catch up with him in Kazakhstan.
NPR

Gay Couple Wins Case; Gains Custody Of Baby Born To Thai Surrogate

A legally married same-sex couple who live in Spain, but whose baby was born to a surrogate mother in Thailand, won a court victory. Rachel Martin talks to Gordon "Bud" Lake III about the case.

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