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Warning Against Eating Meat Has Chinese Olympians Off Their Game

The Chinese women's Olympic volleyball coach blamed his team's recent losses on their lack of access to safe meat while on the road. A lot of meat that's served in China is tainted with a chemical that's also considered a performance-enhancing drug.
NPR

An AIDS-Ravaged Nation Turns To Circumcision

By the end of 2013, Kenyan health officials want more than 1 million men to get circumcised — a procedure that can reduce the risk of contracting HIV by up to 60 percent. If the effort succeeds, it just might prove a model for the rest of Africa.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - International

A senior member of President Assad’s regime defects as world powers discuss ways to end the 16-month old conflict in Syria. Pakistan reopens supply routes after Secretary of State Hillary Clinton apologizes for the death of 24 Pakistani soldiers. And British bank Barclays admits to manipulating global interest rates. Guest host Susan Page speaks with Yochi Dreazen of National Journal Magazine, Nadia Bilbassy of Middle East Broadcast Centre and Mark Mardell of BBC North America Editor.

NPR

After A Forced Abortion, A Roaring Debate In China

A gruesome photo from a forced abortion recently spread across the Internet, provoking outrage at local officials. The anger comes as criticism of China's one-child policy is increasing. Experts say it's creating a demographic disaster that could have profound economic and social consequences.
NPR

'African Booker' Defies Image Of Tragic Continent

The Caine Prize for African Writing recognizes an African writer each year for a short story written in English. This year's prize went to Nigerian Rotimi Babatunde for "Bombay's Republic." It's about a Nigerian soldier who fought in Burma during World War II. Host Michel Martin talks with Babatunde and CNN's Nima Elbagir, one of the judges.
NPR

In Libya's Shifting Sands, Kids Try To Find Their Way

Most Libyans are under 25, and for these young people the revolution has created a new set of possibilities and challenges.

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