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China's Debate: Must The Party Follow The Constitution?

If you demand democracy in China, you can quickly find yourself at odds with the government. So these days, reformers are trying to use the constitution to make the party accountable to the people. But that didn't keep a Shanghai professor from getting suspended.
NPR

More Old People, Fewer Workers: Nations Look To Immigration

The debate can be heard across borders. Foreign workers are now finding jobs in highly homogeneous countries such as South Korea. But in other rapidly aging countries such as Japan, policymakers are wary of allowing immigrant labor.
NPR

Several Deaths Reported After Train Hits Bus In Ottawa

The collision tore apart the front of the bus. No one aboard the passenger train was killed, authorities say, but there were fatalities on the bus.
NPR

New Zealand Men Give New Meaning To The Words: Beer Tap

With the sponsorship of a brewery, the men rigged a friend's home so that beer flowed from all the taps.
NPR

Why Lilly Collins Is The 'Most Dangerous Celebrity'

Fantasy film star Lily Collins seems harmless but beware of looking for more about the starlet on the Internet. According to antivirus software company McAfee, she is the Most Dangerous Celebrity. Plugging Collins' name into a search engine has a 14 percent chance of turning up a computer virus.
NPR

Brazil's President Postpones U.S. Visit Over Spying Concerns

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has put off her state visit to the United States over allegations that the National Security Agency spied on her, ordinary Brazilians and the state oil company. This was supposed to be the first state visit by a Brazilian leader in two decades.
NPR

Evidence In UN Syria Report Makes Regime Most Likely Suspect

UN inspectors have concluded that it was in fact a chemical weapons attack that occurred outside Damascus, Syria on August 23rd. The report does not assign blame for the attack. But according to Peter Bouckaert, Emergencies Director for Human Rights Watch, a careful read of the evidence laid out in the UN report shows the Syrian regime is most likely behind the attack. He talks with Robert Siegel about the UN findings and what they imply.
NPR

As Economy Cools, Brazilians Find Themselves Trapped In Debt

Brazil's banks started giving easy credit about eight years ago. The country was booming, and a new consumer class was created, fueling growth. But that boom is now over, and Brazilians are some of the most indebted people in the world.
NPR

Once Considered A Backwater, Northeast Brazil Is Booming

The northeastern part of Brazil used to be considered the backwards part of the country, far from the riches of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo in the south. That's changed in recent years, and today, northeastern Brazil is experiencing an explosion of industry, propelling millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class. Melissa Block talks with businessman Alfredo Bezerra Leite, owner of a bus company and an engineering firm, and his daughter Rebeca Bezerra Leite, to learn about what's behind this growth in the Northeast.
NPR

Brazil President Postpones U.S. Visit After NSA Revelations

In a slap to the United States, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff announced she is postponing her state visit to Washington. It was scheduled for Oct. 23 and would have been the first state visit of President Obama's second term. The postponement follows revelations that the National Security Agency spied on Rousseff, her top aides and Brazil's state-run oil company.

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